Search Results: "Piotr Naskrecki"


BOOK REVIEW

A WINDOW ON ETERNITY by Edward O. Wilson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 2014

"A big story about a small place with an ageless appreciation and discernment it would be criminal to ignore."
The rebirth of a premier nature reserve in Mozambique, recounted in a gentle storytelling style by noted Harvard entomologist Wilson (Letters to a Young Scientist, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRADUATION DAY by Piotr Parda
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2017

"A possible discussion starter, though enigmatic to a fault. (Picture book. 11-18)"
A subtle reminder that education is a gift no amount of bullying can spoil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GENTLEMAN BAT by Abraham Schroeder
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"A jaunty rhyme that just may teach manners to boot. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A dapper bat, resplendent in top hat, monocle and cane, strolls down 19th-century cobblestone streets to see where the night takes him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOAH'S ARK by Piotr Wilkon
by Piotr Wilkon, translated by Rosemary Lanning, illustrated by Wilkon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Not a first purchase, but an acceptable addition. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A trivialization—with a European flavor—of the familiar story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BRAVE LITTLE KITTENS by Piotr Wilkon
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

"Nice, but not essential. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Three kittens explore the world: first their tails, then the house and barn, where they scare a mouse, finally outdoors, where they chase a hen and a rabbit but a dog frightens them—until Mama Cat makes him turn tail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESCAPE FROM THE ZOO! by Piotr Wilkon
by Piotr Wilkon, translated by Rosemary Lanning, illustrated by Wilkon
ANIMALS
Released: April 15, 1993

"There's not much plot here, but the details are imaginatively developed—especially in the illustrations, rendered in pastels with luminous white lines highlighting delectable night-muted colors and the cages' geometry as an elegant counterpoint to the action. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Though old Matthew the zookeeper has checked all the locks, somehow the animals escape to wander the city, where, to Matthew's astonishment, no one seems surprised to see them mingling with the pedestrians, while a rhino helps itself to a child's ice cream and an elephant plays in a fountain. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MORE THAN ONE KIND OF MIRROR
by Julie Danielson

It’s rare to see picture books that address squalor or anything just short of it. One could argue that children from families with significant economic disadvantages would prefer to read books of escapism. Yet at the same time, as has been addressed and discussed so often in the field of children’s literature, particularly in the past several years, those same ...


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