Search Results: "Pseudonymous Bosch"


BOOK REVIEW

THE NAME OF THIS BOOK IS SECRET by Pseudonymous Bosch
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"The story line is often engaging, but its ubiquitous narrative trope comes across as more annoying than insightful. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Though less common than their Harry Potter brethren, the Lemony Snicket imitators continue to crop up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAD MAGIC by Pseudonymous Bosch
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"Clay is Everykid enough ('almost handsome, in a dried-snot-on-his-sleeve sort of way') to keep readers hanging around to see what happens to him next. (Fantasy. 12-14)"
Very little is as it seems at a survival camp for "troubled" teens in this trilogy opener. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WRITE THIS BOOK by Pseudonymous Bosch
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2013

"Would-be wordsmiths will come away with a marginally useful toolkit and, if not 'hack writing of the highest order' as promised, at least a finished practice piece. (writing tips, self-awards) (Nonfiction. 11-14)"
Offering "a book written by you that's already published," "Bosch" follows his own title page with a blank alternative one, then goes on to sketch out a fragmentary plotline filled with options to circle and dotted lines to fill in (guaranteeing that any library copy won't stay unmarked for long). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAD LUCK by Pseudonymous Bosch
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"For readers who like (or at least don't mind) continual authorial asides, a sturdy middle volume. ('backmatter'; map and illustrations, not seen) (Fantasy. 12-14)"
Still struggling to keep up with his wizardly fellow campers, Clay finally discovers his particular talent when the arrival of a large cruise ship touches off a round of assaults and rescues on remote Price Island. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIERONYMUS BOSCH by Gary Schwartz
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Teenagers will pore over this one. (index) (Biography. 13+)"
Schwartz (Rembrandt, 1992) begins this lucid introduction in the First Impressions series to ``everybody's favorite weird artist'' by asking readers to stop reading and to spend time with the plentiful black-and-white and full-color reproductions of Bosch's work, and to think about what they see, in order to gain a context for his words. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Like Bosch's menage, this may not suit quite everyone; but, for those with minds and hearts open to its wit, artistry, and merriment, a rare delight. (Picture book. 4+)"
Bosch, the late-medieval Dutch artist, painted extraordinary surreal scenes, their whimsical details meticulously depicted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIRDCATDOG by Lee Nordling
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Stylish and inventive and an excellent examination of point of view. (Graphic adventure. 4-8)"
A serene suburban tableau cleverly describes the separate, exciting adventures of a bird, a cat and a dog, each the hero of its own story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHEHEWE by Lee Nordling
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Fun, adventure, misadventure, dragons, flying fish, and lots of color…maybe there's something for everyone in this thrice-told tale. (Graphic adventure. 4-8)"
Both literally and figuratively a three-story book, this follow-up to BirdCatDog (2014) and FishFishFish (2015) illustrates the fantasy adventures of a girl (she) and a boy (he), along with the real story of their picnic and playtime together (we).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FISHFISHFISH by Lee Nordling
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2015

"A peaceful meditation that should delight readers with its multiplicity of composition. (Graphic adventure. 4-8)"
Fish—big, small and many—visually tell their tales as three underwater adventures converge in a cleverly developed wordless graphic format. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CORPSE BY ANY OTHER NAME by Neil McGaughey
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1998

"Malachi is less insufferable than in And Then There Were Ten (1995), though the target audience remains hard-core puzzle-addicts stuck on a train between double-crostics."
Piqued that his agent/wife, Lee Holland, has sold his first mystery novel by ignoring his demand that she keep the author's name a secret and instead telling the publisher that it's the work of nationally syndicated mystery reviewer Stokes Moran, Kyle Malachi decides to take strong measures against his tiresomely successful pseudonym by phoning the New York Times to announce Moran's death. Read full book review >