Search Results: "R P Ericksen"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 13, 2012

"A timely, engaging history of the United States from a progressive professor's point of view."
America's "common history," shared by liberals and conservatives alike, as seen through the battles and accomplishments of the American left. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

P by Andrew Lewis Conn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2003

"A writer to watch."
Patterned on Ulysses, crammed with an entire liberal arts education, this debut's vast ambition goes up against Conn's obvious and genuine talent: against all odds, talent wins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

R-HU by Leslie Scalapino
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Demanding and strange, at times curiously affecting, more often simply infuriating."
The r-hu, we're told, is a Mongolian stringed instrument. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO P-P-P-PLUGGED ROGER RABBIT? by Gary K. Wolf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 1991

"The perfect bookstore browse, though most readers will have had their fill before reaching the register."
Wolf's sequel to Who Censured Roger Rabbit?, the basis for the wildly successful film, presents private eye Eddie Valiant with some conflicting jobs: Roger Rabbit wants him to find out whether Clark Gable's beaten him out for the lead in Gone With the Wind—as well as out of wife Jessica's affections; David Selznick wants him to investigate the theft of a mysterious box from his office (the suspects are the three actors auditioning for Rhett Butler: Gable, Baby Herman, and Roger); Gable wants Eddie to find out who's been planting tabloid stories that say he's gay; and the murder of shadowy toon Kirk Enigman with Eddie's own gun sparks a search for the secret formula for Toon Tonic, which turns people into animated Toons (and vice versa). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO R U REALLY? by Margo Kelly
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 18, 2014

"Kelly's first novel is a suspenseful page-turner with multiple suspects, a little bit of romance, and a strong but not overbearing message. (Thriller. 12-16)"
A naïve 14-year-old longing for a first romance believes she has found it with an online stranger. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

R IS FOR RHYME by Judy Young
ABC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 2006

"This rich compendium would also work well in the classroom, but for an older age group than indicated by the publisher. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Twenty-six sidebar lessons on poetry, each linked to both a poem and a cheeky colorful illustration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A&R by Bill Flanagan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

Debut about the music industry by a writer who's in it and loves it, discords and all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

J. P. by John Mooers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 31, 2013

"A history buff's guilty pleasure, offering a behind-the-scenes peek into the world of a man whose impact on society lasts to this day."
A historical novel that paints an intimate portrait of J.P. Morgan, U.S. banker, financier and philanthropist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GHOST OF ERNIE P. by Betty Ren Wright
Released: Oct. 15, 1990

Though he remembers Ernie as a minor bully and a major pest (Ernie died in a fall from a slide while he was teasing younger kids), Jeff tries to be tactful when everyone assumes that he's mourning his best friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

R IS FOR ROCKET by Tad Hills
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 7, 2015

"Though this lacks the originality and fizz of How Rocket Learned to Read (2010), it nevertheless reinforces the pup's positive literacy efforts. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Adorable Rocket the dog and his many pals (including a moonlighting Goose) return in a new story centered on the alphabet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"A study intended for a general audience as well as academics; although the lay reader may find the theoretical jargon burdensome, the scenes of youngsters interacting are vivid and provocative."
Children "do" race and racism, runs the premise of this ethnographic report from two scholars—and watching how they "do" them can teach us something about teaching, learning, and racial concepts and ideals as well. Read full book review >