Search Results: "R. Kikuo Johnson"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SHARK KING by R. Kikuo Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"A myth involving rampant anthropophagy transformed into a lightly sketched tale of parent-child bonding. (Graphic folktale. 7-9)"
The Shark King's deadly son gets an extreme makeover in this version of a traditional tale from Hawaii. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHT FISHER by R. Kikuo Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A dark, grand, sweeping dream of a book."
The lulling beauty of Hawaii proves a troubling soporific for a quiet and once-promising teenager. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"A thoughtful story, told somewhat indifferently."
The son of a Mexican-American mother and an Anglo father, Johnson ponders life as a "mixed-race" man in the racially charged atmosphere of America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"As refreshingly southern and satisfying as a cool glass of iced tea."
With all the charm of Robert Fulghum, screenwriter Johnson spins a few yarns, shares a few vignettes and offers a variety of commendable life lessons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK MAGIC by Dinah Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Adults will find this book a great conversation starter with little ones. (Picture book. 5-9)"
"My hundred black braids make a spiderweb around my head, / and Mama's voice is black and sweet as I fall asleep." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 3, 1937

"Newspaper people everywhere will want it."
A centenary tribute to makers of journalistic history, the Sunpapers of Baltimore, written by men who have contributed to that history. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BEST BOOKS OF 2016: ANDREA DAVIS PINKNEY
by Poornima Apte

Long before “We Need Diverse Books” gained momentum as a movement towards inclusivity in children’s literature, writer and illustrator Ezra Jack Keats made history. Peter, the star of his groundbreaking picture book, The Snowy Day, was black.

Children’s book author Andrea Davis Pinkney reminds us what a big deal this was in 1962 when the book was first published. The ...


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BOOK REVIEW

HENRY CLIMBS A MOUNTAIN by D.B. Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 22, 2003

"Young readers may not understand concepts of tax protest and slavery, but would welcome reading another story about a familiar and unique character whose deep moral convictions are expressed in simple, daily deeds. (Picture book. 6-9)"
In his third book about Henry David Thoreau, Johnson describes a more complex concept: how people can change bad laws without fighting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MOUSE'S TALE by Pamela Johnson
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

"Unusually appealing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In her first solo effort, an accomplished illustrator (Stolz's fantasies; science books about animals) describes a mouse who, wanting to go to sea, considers many progressively smaller vessels (ship, ferry, rowboat, etc.) before imaginatively constructing her own boat of natural materials. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRE AND SILK by Neil Johnson
NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1991

``Fire and silk'' is a poetic description of the hot air and polyester that really form these genial giants. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOW LET ME FLY by Dolores Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 29, 1993

"Excellent author's note. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Minna narrates her kidnapping by slave traders as a child in Africa and the rough passage to America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGIC BEACH by Crockett Johnson
FANTASY
Released: Nov. 30, 2005

"As in so much else, she was right—but it does make a handsomely packaged artifact for adult readers of children's literature. (Picture book. Adult)"
Issued with revisions in 1965 as Castles in the Sand, with early 60s-ish illustrations by Betty Fraser, this philosophical tale appears here in its original form, beneath Johnson's own rough, expressive sketches—sandwiched between an eloquent appreciation of both author and art by Maurice Sendak, and a publishing history by renowned scholar Philip Nel. Read full book review >