Search Results: "Rachel Ward"


BOOK REVIEW

NUMBERS by Rachel Ward
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"A lovely, bittersweet tearjerker about living life to its fullest. (Fantasy. 13-15)"
Jem's been bouncing between foster homes since her mother overdosed when Jem was only six. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INFINITY by Rachel Ward
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 1, 2012

"A little violent, a little supernatural, a little mysterious, a lot sentimental; fans of the trilogy won't be disappointed as this story edges toward magical thriller. (Science fiction. 13-16)"
A trilogy that began in the recognizable present concludes in a post-apocalyptic dystopic England, 17 years from now. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

RACHEL HULIN
by Megan Labrise

Fancy a Dangerous Liaisons-styledelicacy? Rachel Hulin’s epistolary debut features some lip-smacking secrets between brother and sister.

“I love epistolary novels,” says Hulin, author of Hey Harry, Hey Matilda. “I always try to think about how to get that voyeuristic voice without letters...but it just feels like you’re not getting in there. I really want to be in ...


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BLOG POST

RACHEL CUSK
by J.W. Bonner

In the beginning is the word—not a person, self, or character. And so it is with the newest work of fiction by Rachel Cusk. Transit, her latest novel, is the middle novel of a trilogy that began with 2015’s Outline. In Transit, after a divorce, the narrator, Faye (whose name, as with so many traditional fiction markers, is largely absent ...


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BLOG POST

RACHEL IGNOTOFSKY
by Megan Labrise

August 6, 1926 was a bad day for a swim between England and France: the water was choppy; it started to rain; and the strong current was against Gertrude Ederle, a 19-year-old long-distance swimmer from New York City. Nevertheless, she persisted, becoming the first woman to swim the English Channel and setting a new world record (14 hours, 31 minutes ...


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BOOK REVIEW

HENRY FINDS HIS WORD by Lindsay Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Let this be the first first-word book to pull from the shelf. (Picture book. 1-4)"
Seeing that baby talk isn't working as well as he'd like, Henry decides to find his first word. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T EAT THE BABYSITTER! by Nick Ward
ANIMALS
Released: April 11, 2006

"Will appeal to the shark lovers more than to the parents of their own wild child. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Sammy is a rather excitable shark, who tends to bite things when emotions run high; in his last outing, Don't Eat the Teacher (2004), it was his schoolmates and supplies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLORS by Sarah Ward
by Sarah Ward, illustrated by Sarah Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 2015

"A nifty, hardworking introduction to the world of color. (Board book. 6-18 mos.)"
The colors of the rainbow are explored in this multisensory book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FARMER GEORGE AND THE NEW PIGLET by Nick Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2002

"Pure homespun fun. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Ward's bucolic Galahad, Farmer George, makes a triumphant return, this time rescuing a swine in distress. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

WHAT I'M WATCHING FOR- JULY 2017
by Leila Roy

This is the time of year that feels like someone has their finger on the fast-forward button—it’s already time to comb through this month’s new releases!

These are some of the books that I’m planning to pick up:

Spirit Hunters, by Ellen Oh

I read an advanced copy of this one months ago, and I’m SO looking forward to reading ...


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BOOK REVIEW

ARCHIPELAGO by David Ward
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 21, 2009

"Leaving much unresolved, however, with an ending that is too pat, this is more of an appetizer than a satisfying read. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Shortly after his father's death, 12-year-old Jonah and his photographer mother go on a trip to the Queen Charlotte Islands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRANSLATOR by Ward Just
Released: Sept. 9, 1991

"Fortunately, his spacious work charms and enriches more than it puzzles and confounds."
Two expatriates (he's German, she's American) make a life together in contemporary Paris; characteristically, Just makes us pay attention to the political/cultural context of his domestic story and then, almost as an afterthought, spices it with East/West melodrama. Read full book review >