Search Results: "Rachel Wharton"


BOOK REVIEW

EDIBLE BROOKLYN by Rachel Wharton
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 4, 2011

"Clearly most valuable to those lucky enough to benefit from its local food knowledge firsthand, but will also inspire out-of-town foodies to book the next flight to JFK."
Through a wide variety of unique and delicious recipes, editor Wharton draws a blueprint of Brooklyn's storied locavore food culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVER AFTER by William Wharton
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Wharton's ordeal is not easy reading, but his persistence in assailing the woeful cause for it is highly admirable."
A piercing cry from the heart, a resounding call for reform — and that rare thing: a unique book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BUCCANEERS by Edith Wharton
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Not entirely knitted together—some awfully vivid characters just drop from sight—but, still, this is wonderful to read. (First printing of 50,000; Book-of-the-Month Dual Selection)"
A major novel of manners, three-fifths completed at the time of Wharton's death in 1937 and published as a fragment in 1938, has now been finished with impressive spirit and skill by Wharton scholar Marion Mainwaring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GLIMPSES OF THE MOON by Edith Wharton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1994

"As Wharton tells their story, the sharp irony of both her prose and her characters bleeds into pools of true feeling."
Long out of print, Wharton's novel opens with a sentence that seems to have been written for the opening voice-over of a movie: ``It rose for them—their honey-moon—over the waters of a lake so famed as the scene of romantic raptures that they were rather proud of not having been afraid to choose it as the setting of their own.'' But Nick and Susy Lansing, each suffering from a genteel lack of money, have married out of convenience rather than romantic rapture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MIDNIGHT CLEAR by William Wharton
Released: Sept. 10, 1982

"So, even if Wharton's narrative voice remains so warmly inviting and unpretentious that you can't help but be carried along, this time the journey has a scattered destination: experience reflected in bits and pieces of mirror rather than in a ceiling of glass (Bird) or a whole interior room of it (Dad)."
??Wharton's previous novels—Birdy, Dad—have treated the extraordinary and the strangely angled with such quiet ordinariness that one reads this seemingly plain WW II story waiting for the catch—the resonance couched in deceptively straight-ahead language that is Wharton's strongest imaginative virtue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAD by William Wharton
Released: May 28, 1981

"So: a major novel from a writer whose magnitude has now been gloriously confirmed—in a haunting book full of pain and misery, but one which (thanks to Wharton's method, skill, and vista) you have to be reminded to be depressed over."
Nothing clarifies and focuses a superior first novel like its successor: all the cells of the former are stained by the latter's stresses, repetitions; and a pattern ought to start to emerge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST LOVERS by William Wharton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1991

"All in all: sadly familiar post-Birdy, post-Dad coasting."
Wharton processes a slow, sugarcoated buzz in this charming but perforated confection, once again falling short of the verve achieved in Birdy (1979) and Dad (1981). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNCOLLECTED CRITICAL WRITINGS by Edith Wharton
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Some of these pieces admirably display Wharton's high cultural standards, incisive critical eye, and conservative literary tastes, but many are works only the most devoted Whartonian would need to read."
Cleaning out the Wharton attic, Wegener (Literature/Baruch Coll.) has assembled a jumble sale of her nonfiction, with a few notable finds amid the lumber. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANKY FURBO by William Wharton
Released: Oct. 1, 1989

"It's an unhappy thing to see."
A painter named William Wiley lives with his free-spirited American family in rural Italy, making a living by writing children's books—and for years enchanting his family with the tales of Franky Furbo, an archetypal, wise old fox that Wiley claims to have spoken to during the War—and that he claims in fact to have been rescued by in body and mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCUMBLER by William Wharton
Released: May 22, 1984

In Wharton's two best novels, Birdy and Dad, a trapdoor seems to open about halfway through—with the reader suddenly dropped to a startling plane of reality, something very different from the conventional reality suggested by the homely, casual surface tone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"They will thank you for the recommendation. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
After Will Lightfoot steals and wrecks his father's motorcycle, he stumbles into a foreign world—a fractured realm in which stories originate and from which they migrate, transformed, into other worlds. Read full book review >