Search Results: "Rafael Yglesias"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WISDOM OF PERVERSITY by Rafael Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 24, 2015

"Most important, he shines a Kleig light where it may be most needed, into the parlors and playrooms where many Americans endure or perpetrate these nightmares."
Three New York friends, in their childhood and adult selves, deal with a wily pedophile in an affecting novel that is big-screen lurid without being superficial or too slick. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HAPPY MARRIAGE by Rafael Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2009

"A would-be tragedy that plays unsuccessfully on the inherent fascination with sex and death."
Autobiographical work from novelist/screenwriter Yglesias (Dr. Neruda's Cure for Evil, 1996, etc.) chronicles a man's confrontation with the imminent death of his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DR. NERUDA'S CURE FOR EVIL by Rafael Yglesias
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 18, 1996

"But the strong plot keeps us fascinated and reading. (Film rights to Twentieth Century Fox; author tour)"
Gripping, deep-delving psychological novel that offers a new path in analysis but can't sustain the melodrama implied in its title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEARLESS by Rafael Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 1993

"Smells like a wonderful story that should enjoy huge word of mouth."
Writing very smartly indeed but no better or worse than in his largely well-received Hot Properties, The Murderer Next Door, etc., Yglesias achieves by sheer dint of an inspired story what may be his breakthrough novel (already optioned for a Peter Weir film starring Jeff Bridges and Isabella Rossellini). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROOTING FOR RAFAEL ROSALES by Kurtis Scaletta
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 25, 2017

"Full of heart and hope. (Fiction. 9-13)"
A young man grows up in the Dominican Republic with ambitions to play baseball while a young girl in Minnesota finds the world both bigger and more encouraging when she becomes his fan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRLS by Helen Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 1999

"Not one of Yglesias's best, but nevertheless a thoughtful, grimly convincing portrait of old age: something of a rarity in our fiction, and a story well worth attending to."
Yglesias's first novel in 12 years (The Saviors, 1987, etc.) is an intense portrayal of four elderly sisters variously raging against the dying of the light in contemporary Miami Beach. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GUNS IN THE CLOSET by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"It is useful to have his stories collected in one volume, but it's also clear that Yglesias was always a more effective writer when he worked on a larger canvas."
A posthumous gathering of tales by the noted Cuban-American writer (The Old Gents, see below). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WAKE IN YBOR CITY by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Yglesias's grasp of immigrant family dynamics is masterly, but the stylistic assurance and narrative economy displayed in his mature fiction (Double Double, 1974, The Truth About Them, 1971, etc.) are only faintly adumbrated by this less even apprentice work."
The "thirty-fifth anniversary edition" (really, now) of the late Cuban-American writer's 1963 debut novel—an authoritative though imperfectly constructed story set in Tampa's Latino section (Ybor City) in 1958, on the eve of the Cuban Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OLD GENTS by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An unsatisfyingly abrupt ending can't dim the glow of the low-key pleasures to be had here."
Yglesias's last novel, published by the same house that has recently issued the Break-In (p. 259) and a collection of the author's stories (see above). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BREAK-IN by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"In bringing this defiant old wreck to a recognition of what he has in common with a confused black kid, Yglesias has fashioned a novel that some may dismiss as simplistic; others, though, will discover that it both moves them and makes them think."
A hard-won lesson in race relations and an appealing character study are the distinguishing features of the absorbing and entertaining latest from the author, Tristan and the Hispanics (1989), etc. Seventy-two-year-old widower Rudy Pardo, a retired fire chief, lives just ``uptown'' from Tampa's Latino community, a comfortable distance from his annoyingly helpful older sisters Lucinda (and her pathetic, unemployable son ``Little Stevie'') and ``liberal'' Connie (and her ``communist'' husband). Read full book review >