Search Results: "Ralph Cosentino"


BOOK REVIEW

BATMAN by Ralph Cosentino
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2008

"To younger children, Batman will come across as sinister, but not uncomfortably so, and despite all the crimefighting depicted, the level of explicit violence is relatively low. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Joining the pre-release buzz for his latest film (scheduled for summer), Batman steps out of the shadows to introduce himself to less practiced readers who might be a little hazy on what he's all about. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WONDER WOMAN by Ralph Cosentino
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2011

"Still, she stands as proof that there's more to this superhero business than big muscles and testosterone-fueled aggression. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Cosentino's third introduction to a costumed superhero for newly independent readers (Superman, 2010, etc.) adequately covers the basics while resolutely placing its subject on the moral and ethical high ground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPERMAN by Ralph Cosentino
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2010

"While it's certainly never too soon to introduce children to the first and still greatest of the modern costumed crime-fighters, he, and they, deserve better than this knockoff. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Cribbing freely from the classic TV show and the 1978 movie as well as episodes from decades of comics, the Man of Steel tersely describes his origins and strongly declares his intention to "fight a never-ending battle for truth and justice." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A tender tale of togetherness to shelve next to such similar but unlikely partnerships as Lawrence David's Pickle and Penguin (p. 1003). (Picture book. 6-8)"
Cosentino claims this pillow-meets-dog tale to be the result of "49% imagination, 48% inspiration, 3% perspiration," and those proportions look about right, as the childlike art is all simple, rounded forms and uniform color fields, but depicts an animistic world of stick-limbed figures that will leave young viewers chortling over its quirky turns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARVELOUS ADVENTURES OF FUN-BOY by Ralph Cosentino
ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"A crowd-pleaser, imbued with Calvin & Hobbes-style humor. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Cosentino offers 12 nearly wordless mishaps, each told in four big sequential cartoon panels rendered in a retro graphic style on double pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RALPH MASIELLO'S ROBOT DRAWING BOOK by Ralph Masiello
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

"Brainstorming—a book that ought to launch a thousand robots. (Nonfiction. 6-9)"
Masiello elegantly and joyfully taps into a thankfully enduring artistic tradition: the step-by-step technique that walks readers by hand through the creation of an image on paper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE.COM by Ralph Steadman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2016

"The artist's fans might key in, but most young readers will be left in the dark. (Picture book. 7-9)"
When your computer powers down, the little "dot" is off-duty. You don't think it just sits there, do you? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALSO KNOWN AS ROWAN POHI by Ralph Fletcher
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 14, 2011

"Lightweight fluff in the Chris Lynch/Chris Crutcher mode, if that's possible. (Fiction. 13-15)"

BOOK REVIEW

SPIDER BOY by Ralph Fletcher
ANIMALS
Released: April 14, 1997

"Creating and guiding a winning cast with a light, sure hand, Fletcher puts a fine, fresh spin on a familiar premise. (Fiction. 10-13)"
In a story every bit as engaging as Fletcher's Fig Pudding (1995), and less of an emotional rollercoaster to boot, a seventh- grade arachnophile and his beloved tarantula take some time adjusting to a family move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIG PUDDING by Ralph Fletcher
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 1995

"Sensitive to all the potential problems of the disparity between the substance and the style of his book, Fletcher (I Am Wings, not reviewed) displays an extremely gentle touch. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A book about a big happy family, with lots of laughter, lots of cooking, and lots of eating; it opens with Cliff, the 11-year- old narrator and oldest of six children, ``getting ready to dig into a steaming plate of French toast,'' and closes with his whole family laughing so hard that tears are running down their faces. Read full book review >