Search Results: "Randa Abdel-Fattah"


BOOK REVIEW

THE FRIENDSHIP MATCHMAKER by Randa Abdel-Fattah
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 17, 2012

"Abdel-Fattah demonstrates a savvy understanding of the middle school experience in this keenly observed tale. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Seventh-grader Lara Zany's reign as the self-appointed "Potts County Middle School official Friendship Matchmaker" is in peril. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN THINGS I HATE ABOUT ME by Randa Abdel-Fattah
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"Written with insight, humor and sensitivity, Abdel-Fattah introduces a winning Muslim-Australian heroine who discovers that 'honesty is liberating.' (Fiction. 12-16)"
A 16-year-old Australian-Muslim-Lebanese teen wonders who she really is as she straddles two cultural realities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FRIENDSHIP MATCHMAKER GOES UNDERCOVER by Randa Abdel-Fattah
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 6, 2013

"Although she struggles in her efforts to resolve her managing ways, Lara's genuine kindness and compassion remain evident in this poignant sequel. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Seventh-grader Lara discovers just how difficult it can be to change established habits. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOES MY HEAD LOOK BIG IN THIS? by Randa Abdel-Fattah
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2007

"11 readers. (Fiction. 13-18)"
An "Australian-Muslin-Palestinian" teen opts to wear the hijab, the Muslim head scarf, full-time, embarking on a courageous exercise in self-understanding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LINES WE CROSS by Randa Abdel-Fattah
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 9, 2017

"A meditation on a timely subject that never forgets to put its characters and their stories first. (Fiction. 12-17)"
An Afghani-Australian teen named Mina earns a scholarship to a prestigious private school and meets Michael, whose family opposes allowing Muslim refugees and immigrants into the country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE THE STREETS HAD A NAME by Randa Abdel-Fattah
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"A refreshing and hopeful teen perspective on the Israeli-Palestinian dilemma. (glossary of Arabic words) (Fiction. 9-12)"
As she did in Does My Head Look Big in This? (2007) and Ten Things I Hate About Me (2009), Abdel-Fattah introduces a bright, articulate Muslim heroine coping with contemporary life, this time during the West Bank Israeli-Palestinian conflict in 2004. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

RANDA ABDEL-FATTAH
by Megan Labrise

To get the girl in Randa Abdel-Fattah’s YA novel, The Lines We Cross, Australian teenager Michael Blainey needs to get (and stay) “woke”—though it’s probably not the term he would use.

“I’m familiar with it,” Abdel-Fattah says of the slang usage denoting possession of a social justice consciousness, “but it’s very much an American-specific context word, although it certainly ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

HIM, ME, MUHAMMAD ALI by Randa Jarrar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A record of an author finding her voice."
Debut collection from the award-winning author of A Map of Home (2008). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MAP OF HOME by Randa Jarrar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2008

"A coming-of-age story that's both singular and universal—an outstanding debut."
A first-time novelist offers a fictional take on her own complex heritage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER BIN LADEN by Abdel Bari Atwan
NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 2013

"A sobering, intensive report."
An al-Qaida watcher lends some farsighted insight into the group's motivation and direction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE IN EXILE by Bahaa Taher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Incidental echoes of Hemingway, Malraux, and Camus enrich the texture of an unusually intelligent and absorbing political tale."
A brooding 1995 novel by Taher (Aunt Safiyya and the Monastery, 1996), winner of the prestigious Egyptian State Prize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHICAGO by Alaa Al Aswany
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2008

"Racy delivery and breathless cliffhangers scarcely conceal the author's pessimism about democracy's future in Egypt—or, for that matter, in the United States."
In Al Aswany's follow-up to The Yacoubian Building (2005), Egyptian students and professors find scant refuge in post-9/11 Chicago. Read full book review >