Search Results: "Ray Bradbury"


BOOK REVIEW

DEATH IS A LONELY BUSINESS by Ray Bradbury
Released: Oct. 28, 1985

"Scott Joplin); and—on nearly every page—quirky blendings of creepiness and humor, innocence and decadence, nightmare and cartoon."
Though dedicated to the memory of mystery-writers Chandler, Hammett, Cain, and Macdonald, Bradbury's new novel—his first full-length fiction since Something Wicked This Way Comes—isn't really an homage to the hard-boiled detective genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARTIAN CHRONICLES by Ray Bradbury
Released: May 4, 1950

"None of the complexities of concepts or formulae, this has an imaginative rather than technical ingenuity."
A flight of fancy in time and space which transcribes some incidents which take place on the planet of Mars, there's a literary, visionary quality here and an avoidance of the more mechanistic aspects of this medium. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 2, 1990

"A tall crock of kirsch and Classic Coke."
Hyperrhapsodic Hollywood fantasia borne on a soft-rubber mystery plot, or Moby Dick blown up on a trout's spine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 17, 1963

"Bradbury, in perfect orbit."
Whether the author's vision turns toward the future or peers into the past, his worlds of characters and their situations always carry the air of possibility. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF RAY BRADBURY by Ray Bradbury
Released: April 6, 2010

"No surprises—just a major, one-of-a-kind talent in full regalia."
Dinosaurs, vampires, time-warps, Green Town, lions, ghosts, Martians (of course), dreadful trips to Mexico, "The Parrot That Met Papa" Hemingway, strangely dreamy movie-houses in Ireland—100 stories by the always surprisingly versatile Mr. Bradbury. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Writing for the fun of writing. A treat for the reader."
Two novellas from the big heart of an American original—one about time and music, the other a riff on Moby-Dick. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I SING THE BODY ELECTRIC! by Ray Bradbury
Released: Oct. 21, 1969

"Rice Crispies."
Eighteen stories, Bradbury's first collection in five years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRIVING BLIND by Ray Bradbury
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Typically diverse, veering between sentiment and nostalgia, and set forth in the curiously mannered, modern-antique style that has become Bradbury's trademark."
Arriving too late for a full review, grandmaster Bradbury's latest collection (Quicker Than the Eye, 1996, etc.) consists of 17 new tales and 4 reprints, 197497. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 28, 1973

"In either event, it might sell more copies than all this year's NBA nominees put together."
This sing-song collection of pretentious verse by the famous sci-fi author indicates once again, as if it needed proving, that most fiction writers have not the slightest aptitude for poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDEN APPLES OF THE SUN by Ray Bradbury
Released: March 19, 1953

"A very pleasant variety show."
A double dozen from a recognized science-fiction writer, these stories range further in subject than his expected field, so that this is not necessarily confined to bug-eyed monster devotees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Essays made up mainly of declamation. Stick with the novels and stories that ensure Bradbury's place in the pantheon."
In three dozen pieces sometimes prickly and always passionate, SF/fantasy legend Bradbury fires off opinions galore on books, movies, SF and the people and places in his life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROM THE DUST RETURNED by Ray Bradbury
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A far cry from the great early stories, but filled with a nostalgic charm that vitiates Bradbury's notorious rhetorical laxness and sentimentality. One of his most attractive and satisfying works in quite some time."
At last—a book you can judge by its cover. For this one sports a wonderfully macabre illustration born of Charles Addams's brief collaboration with master fantasist Bradbury, best known for such classic fiction as The Martian Chronicles (1950) and Fahrenheit 451 (1953). Read full book review >