Search Results: "Ray Jayawardhana"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 10, 2013

"Jayawardhana includes a fascinating account of the disputes between the theorists and experimentalists in this epic scientific adventure story with—as of yet—no last chapter."
An astrophysicist explains why scientists are eager to learn more about the elusive, "pathologically shy" neutrino. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE T.F. LETTERS by Karen Ray
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Readers in the know will appreciate the creative adult-child communication and picture Alex's parents grappling to smooth her adjustment; others will settle for believing, as Alex does, in magic. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Suddenly, Alex Vandershoot is going through a lot of changes, losing her first tooth, and facing her family's move to California from Texas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE APPLE-PIP PRINCESS by Jane Ray
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2008

"Ray's trademark illustrations of vibrant scenes and delicate details enliven this satisfying, original fairy tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Since the queen's death, the heart has gone out of the kingdom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2010

"Full of visual aids and a lead-by-example attitude, this refreshing book of recipes is a useful tool in promoting a healthy lifestyle and gradual weight loss."
A guide for dieters who like to keep food journals, measure portions and count calories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO CROSS A LINE by Karen Ray
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"An afterword sums up what later happened to Egon and his family. (Fiction. 12+)"
In her first book for young people, a novelist recounts her Jewish father-in-law's experiences in escaping Germany. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Jenkins's recounting of the crimes, investigation, and trial is as suspenseful as his wide-net harvest of historical context is enlightening. (20 b&w photos, not seen)"
A disciplined, incisive reconstruction of one of the century's most notorious crimes: the 1989 mail-bomb assassination of a federal judge and an NAACP attorney. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 20, 1994

In a challenging, timely, and persuasive argument, Jackendoff (Brandeis; the scholarly Semantics and Cognition, 1983—not reviewed) proposes that language and, by extension, music and visual experience in part culturally engendered—but that, fundamentally, they're expressions of innate, perhaps even genetic, properties of the brain. Read full book review >