Search Results: "Ray Villareal"


BOOK REVIEW

DON'T CALL ME HERO by Ray Villareal
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 31, 2011

"A good story with some unexpected twists. (Fiction. 12-15)"
After saving the life of a famous model, a 14-year-old Mexican-American boy learns the pressures of popularity and the definition of true heroism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BRIDGE by Ray Villareal
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 31, 2014

"Villareal paints a believable picture of what can happen to a family when a crisis hits and how such events can ripple throughout every aspect of an adolescent's life. (Fiction. 11-14)"
The loss of his mother catapults a young teen and his father into homelessness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BODY SLAMMED! by Ray Villareal
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 2012

"More about teachable moments than suplexes and drop kicks. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A San Antonio teenager hooks up with a fast-living pro wrestler and discovers the downside of hanging out with risky companions in this sequel to My Father, the Angel of Death (2006). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO’S BURIED IN THE GARDEN? by Ray Villareal
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 31, 2009

"This story of three Latino boys with Stephen King-ish imaginations ought to find a wide audience. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Seventh grader Joshua Ramirez knows he shouldn't believe Artie Mendoza's story: Mrs. Foley surely didn't murder her husband and bury him in her flower garden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAY CHARLES by Michael Lydon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 11, 1999

"Ironically, Lydon notes that the autobiography has 'only one fully fleshed-out character: Brother Ray'; the same could be said for his own work. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A disappointingly superficial account of the life of one of popular music's elder statesmen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 12, 2011

"The sad story, well and respectfully told, of an American original struggling with procrustean politics, timorous producers and personal demons."
A veteran biographer of film legends records the sad career arc of Nicholas Ray (1911-1979), the director of one of Hollywood's most iconic films, Rebel Without a Cause (1955). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARMADILLO RAY by John Beifuss
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"In his first book, Beifuss's text is somewhat wordy, but its point is simple and accessible, its protagonist endearing, and the vibrancy of the illustrations silences debate over minor details. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Readers will be drawn here first to newcomer Turley's paintings: oil pastels more dazzling than Mexican folk art that depict a stylized southwestern landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PANDA RAY by Michael Kandel
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1996

"Stanislaw Lem."
Formidably weird fantasy about the process of growing up, from an author perhaps best known for his resplendent translations of Stanislaw Lem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAY HARRYHAUSEN by Ray Harryhausen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"A must for special-effects aficionados and geeky fantasy addicts everywhere."
The king of stop-motion animation lays out his varied career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAY GUN by Dean Kuipers
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"The anthology offers a stunning gallery of cutting-edge design, but its highly experimental mix of images and text is likely to make it of interest only to designers and the already initiated."
This anthology drawn from the pages of Ray Gun, one of the most visually idiosyncratic and original music magazines now being published, demonstrates just how consistently inventive and challenging the design of the magazine is but doesn't make the ``new niche cool'' publication any easier to understand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAY & JOAN by Lisa Napoli
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A book characterized by deep research and a seamless weaving together of the details of different lives."
A dual biography of the man who made McDonald's ubiquitous and his third wife, who, after his death, spent the last two decades of her life becoming one of most generous philanthropists in American history. Read full book review >