Search Results: "Rebecca Woods"


BOOK REVIEW

REBECCA by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Sept. 23, 1938

"Should be easy to sell — easy to rent."
A brilliant piece of writing, with the atmosphere and suspense and pace that made Jamaica Inn an absorbing and thrilling story — and it has besides a depth of characterization and soundness of psychological conflict that makes it a finer and more penetrating book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHELTERING REBECCA by Mary Baylis-White
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Not very deep, but pleasant as the story of a friendship and authentic as far as it goes. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When Rebecca arrives in Sally's class after being smuggled out of Germany in 1938, Sally knows little about Hitler's persecutions; but when she is given special responsibility for the young Jewish refugee, the two quickly become close friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 9, 2012

"An irreverent but stylish critique of a privileged social milieu."
The hypercompetitive rituals and other inanities of elite suburban preschools get a merciless but droll dissection in Woods' debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 29, 2012

"The unfolding mystery—not the characters—will keep readers interested in this dark tale."
Mystery novelist Simpson (A Debt of Death, 2008, etc.) weaves a twist-filled tale of deception about a young wife who disappears at a mall in upstate New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REBECCA WEST by Carl Rollyson
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"All of the juice has been squeezed out of the details of a long, rich, unique life. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Rollyson (The Lives of Norman Mailer, 1991, etc.) piles on the details but never gets to the novelist, critic, and essayist known as Dame Rebecca West, born Cecily Fairfield (she borrowed her pen name from an Ibsen character). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REBECCA WENTWORTH’S DISTRACTION by Robert J. Begiebing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 30, 2003

"Begiebing's narrative tends to get bogged down in historical detail, but it's arresting enough to carry you through to the end. A truly creepy tale."
In this latest American Gothic from Begiebing (The Adventures of Allegra Fullerton, 1999, etc.), a mysterious girl runs afoul of her relatives and becomes the obsession of a young artist in 18th-century New England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KEY TO REBECCA by Ken Follett
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 22, 1980

"Top-notch entertainment—shrewdly paced, cannily crafted."
If they liked it once, they'll love it twice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OTHER REBECCA by Maureen Freely
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2000

"A delicious but sometimes disappointing retelling of the legendary page-turner."
From an American writer (My Year with the Stork Club, 1993, etc.) yet published first in Britain: a wickedly clever and witty reworking of Du Maurier's famous novel, a takeoff that falters only when Rebecca herself appears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHITETHORN WOODS by Maeve Binchy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 2007

"Her sentimental morality may be predictable, but Binchy's lilting Irish zest is undeniably addictive."
Binchy (Quentins, 2002, etc.) inserts questions of faith into her usual romantic braid of multiple storylines, in this case concerning the troubled residents, former residents and descendents of residents of an Irish town where an obscure shrine faces demolition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIG WOODS by William Faulkner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1955

"A special plus item- not to be handled as a big new Faulkner."
A gift book, this, with illustrations by Edward Shenton, and containing the hunting stories spanning two generations and set in the Big Woods, thirty miles from Jefferson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOODS by Harlan Coben
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 17, 2007

"All the surprises you'd expect from Coben, but a lot fewer thrills."
Twenty years after his teenaged sister and three of her friends were murdered at their summer camp, a New Jersey prosecutor learns that one of the victims—and maybe more than one—may have walked away. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"Carson devotees will already be familiar with some of this material; the more casual (if no less admiring) fan will find in this collection an engaging glimpse into the breadth of Carson's curiosity and the fashioning of her public voice as a defender of the environment."
Biographer Lear (Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature, 1997) knits together here a number of Rachel Carson's writings—often much more personal, quirky, and searching than her celebrated books—that add meat to her body of literary/scientific writing. Read full book review >