Search Results: "Rebecca L. Hegar"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 7, 1992

"Not a behind-the-headlines exposÇ, but an earnest and thoughtful introduction to a perplexing problem whose complexities require further research."
Each year, more than 300,000 American parents abduct their children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REBECCA by Daphne du Maurier
Released: Sept. 23, 1938

"Should be easy to sell — easy to rent."
A brilliant piece of writing, with the atmosphere and suspense and pace that made Jamaica Inn an absorbing and thrilling story — and it has besides a depth of characterization and soundness of psychological conflict that makes it a finer and more penetrating book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHELTERING REBECCA by Mary Baylis-White
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Not very deep, but pleasant as the story of a friendship and authentic as far as it goes. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When Rebecca arrives in Sally's class after being smuggled out of Germany in 1938, Sally knows little about Hitler's persecutions; but when she is given special responsibility for the young Jewish refugee, the two quickly become close friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 29, 2012

"The unfolding mystery—not the characters—will keep readers interested in this dark tale."
Mystery novelist Simpson (A Debt of Death, 2008, etc.) weaves a twist-filled tale of deception about a young wife who disappears at a mall in upstate New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REBECCA WEST by Carl Rollyson
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"All of the juice has been squeezed out of the details of a long, rich, unique life. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Rollyson (The Lives of Norman Mailer, 1991, etc.) piles on the details but never gets to the novelist, critic, and essayist known as Dame Rebecca West, born Cecily Fairfield (she borrowed her pen name from an Ibsen character). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An election-year must-read."
Becker's novel, republished from 1995, imagines an alternate political reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KEY TO REBECCA by Ken Follett
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 22, 1980

"Top-notch entertainment—shrewdly paced, cannily crafted."
If they liked it once, they'll love it twice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REBECCA WENTWORTH’S DISTRACTION by Robert J. Begiebing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 30, 2003

"Begiebing's narrative tends to get bogged down in historical detail, but it's arresting enough to carry you through to the end. A truly creepy tale."
In this latest American Gothic from Begiebing (The Adventures of Allegra Fullerton, 1999, etc.), a mysterious girl runs afoul of her relatives and becomes the obsession of a young artist in 18th-century New England. Read full book review >