Search Results: "Rebecca Stead"


BOOK REVIEW

GOODBYE STRANGER by Rebecca Stead
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Superb. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Three interwoven narrative strands explore the complicated possibilities of friendship in early adolescence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST LIGHT by Rebecca Stead
ADVENTURE
Released: June 26, 2007

"Thoroughly enjoyable arctic adventure. (Fiction. 9-12)"
With the impending threat of global warning as an ominous backdrop, teens from very different worlds find they have much in common. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"Original and winning. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A seventh-grade boy who is coping with social and economic issues moves into a new apartment building, where he makes friends with an over-imaginative home-schooled boy and his eccentric family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN YOU REACH ME by Rebecca Stead
FICTION
Released: July 14, 2009

When Miranda's best friend Sal gets punched by a strange kid, he abruptly stops speaking to her; then oddly prescient letters start arriving. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEATH OF THE BODY by C.K. Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"An amusing, clever, and agreeably literate portrait of a hapless Lucky Jim sort."
A witty romp through New Zealand academe—with metafiction and mystery joining hands in the picaresque adventures of Professor Harry Butler, obsessed with the Mind/Body problem in more ways than one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MANSFIELD by C.K. Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2005

"Relies too much on its characters' famous names to hold the reader's attention."
Stead (Talking About O'Dwyer, 2000, etc.) takes a fellow New Zealander, short-story master Katherine Mansfield, as the protagonist of his listless tenth novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONATHAN AND THE BIG BLUE BOAT by Philip C. Stead
ADVENTURE
Released: June 7, 2011

"Stead encourages children to puzzle over minutia, readying them to think about more opaque topics: growing up, obsolescence and the intrigue of old, forgotten things. (Picture book. 2-6)"
After Jonathan's parents trade his teddy bear Frederick for a more useful and age-appropriate toaster, he sets sail on a rusty Big Blue Boat to find his lost toy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IDEAS ARE ALL AROUND by Philip C. Stead
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: March 1, 2016

"In all, Stead has given readers a deeply felt, deeply connected story that is homage to creation—and really quite brilliant. (Picture book. 4 & up)"
A ramble through the neighborhood gets the creative juices going in this picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE HOTEL by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2017

"This is an excellent place for the Stead novice to begin enjoying her artistry."
The guests of a modest hotel in postwar Switzerland reveal their unsettled lives on a ravaged continent in this reissue of a masterful 1973 work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TONY by Ed Galing
Kirkus Star
by Ed Galing, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Readers will hear the 'clip-clop, clip-clop, clip-clop' in every image of this astonishing book. (Picture book. 2-12)"
Poet Galing (1917-2013) leads Tony, a dairy delivery horse, through the veil of memory, encantatory phrasing—circling and repetitious—calling him plodding from pre-dawn into the present, his sturdy flank barely expanding with the effort. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAUTIES AND FURIES by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2017

"A welcome reissue of an intriguing, atmospherically rich work."
A woman leaves her husband in London for a younger man in Paris, where the affair takes unusual turns thanks to a conniving fellow the lovers befriend in this ambitious 1936 novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LETTY FOX: HER LUCK by Christina Stead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 19, 2001

"Yes, there are 'occasional flashes of good writing' and 'bits of bitter humor,' but Stead's sixth novel is 'definitely fluff.'"
Best known for The Man Who Loved Children, Stead (1920-83) draws on the two central biographical facts of her life for this apparently amoral tale of modern play, work, and sex, first published in 1946: her sad childhood in Australia and her later life among the New York intellectual crowd. Read full book review >