Search Results: "Reginald Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

GOOD MORNING, MIDNIGHT by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 3, 2004

"Pared down and brisker than last year's behemoth Death's Jest-book, this 21st pairing of crime fiction's most entertaining odd couple is a dazzler—Hill's best in years."
A homicide that's meant to look like a suicide, or is it the other way around? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECALLED TO LIFE by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Not quite the equal of the sterling Bones and Silence (1990), but several lengths ahead of the current competition."
When new evidence in a 1963 murder case leads to a new trial for nanny Cissy Kohler, who's been serving a life sentence for killing her employer's wife Pam Westropp, peerlessly curmudgeonly Mid-Yorkshire Chief Supt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNDERWORLD by Reginald Hill
Released: June 27, 1988

"Textured, too, with police-department politics, gritty atmosphere, and earthy pubtalk: the richest, strongest Hill since Ruling Passion a decade ago."
Hill's Yorkshire police-procedurals are unusually varied, from the black-comedy of Exit Lines to the psychodrama of A Killing Kindness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN APRIL SHROUD by Reginald Hill
Released: April 28, 1986

"No great suspense or surprises—but, with a lake-chase at the close and other bits of watery atmosphere, this is a solid entertainment in the Hill manner: sardonic, darkly funny, occasionally even a little haunting, with foul Dalziel at his most grimly vulnerable."
First US publication for a 1975 Dalziel/Pascoe mystery (cf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEADHEADS by Reginald Hill
Released: May 22, 1984

"With a nice, low-key fadeout and a botanical motif throughout: sly, tart British crime-entertainment—uncompelling, a bit overextended, but drily engaging."
Yorkshire cops Dalziel and Pascoe (A Killing Kindness, Ruling Passion) make a welcome return here—but, with the killer out-front throughout, this is more a black-comic entertainment than a murder-mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH’S JEST-BOOK by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Certainly not without its rewards—bumptious Andy and elegant Peter are in top form—but if only there'd been a bit of pruning."
A 20th helping of Dalziel and Pascoe, together with at least as many subplots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD SYMPATHY by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"1026, etc.), but in a vein of unadulterated downscale farce, with the most enterprising new hero since Super Marlo Brothers."
Veteran Hill's spanking new (though already shop-soiled) hero, balding black PI Joe Sixsmith, has a meddlesome aunt; an imperious (and kidnap-prone) cat; a neighborhood (Luton, Bedfordshire) full of layabouts, petty crooks, and vigilantes; and the wildest client list this side of Jupiter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BONES AND SILENCE by Reginald Hill
Released: Aug. 14, 1990

"Pascoe novel yet—and one whose humor, keenness, and insight place him securely in the company of Ruth Rendell and P.D. James, and well ahead of most of their recent work."
Yorkshire police duo Supt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLABORATORS by Reginald Hill
Released: July 14, 1989

"In Hill's view of war, there can only be losers."
Hill takes time out from his notable series featuring detectives Dalziel and Pascoe for a longish (448 pp.) tale—first published in Britain in 1987, and very much in the mode of his WW I chronicle No Man's Land—of moral and political compromise, despair, and unexpected love in occupied France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRAITOR'S BLOOD by Reginald Hill
Released: Oct. 15, 1986

"Unsympathetic hero, frenetic doings: disappointing suspense—even if stylish reminders of Hill's considerable talent abound."
Hill, author of the fine Dalziel/Pascoe mysteries, is less sure-footed when it comes to espionage thrillers—this is his weakest effort in that genre: a hectic yet talky spy/revenge/chase tale that begins with a certain far-fetched vigor, then becomes gnarled in increasingly tiresome convolutions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO GUARDS A PRINCE by Reginald Hill
Released: June 14, 1982

"A half-appealing hybrid, then: a corny conspiracy yarn delivered with charm, irony, and laid-back savvy—more akin to Christie and Buchan than Ludlum & Co."
Hill, author of superior mysteries (A Pinch of Snuff) and so-so espionage (The Spy's Wife), now branches out into international conspiracy-suspense-with a crisp, agreeably peopled reworking of the sort of plot that was already old hat when Agatha Christie tried it on in the Twenties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOODCUTTER by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Near the end, a character refers to the fate of 'the dreadful, drab English.' There's nothing drab about this dark and compelling novel, although some of its characters are dreadful human beings."
A grim-dandy psychological thriller about betrayal and revenge set in England. Read full book review >