Search Results: "Reginald Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WOODCUTTER by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Near the end, a character refers to the fate of 'the dreadful, drab English.' There's nothing drab about this dark and compelling novel, although some of its characters are dreadful human beings."
A grim-dandy psychological thriller about betrayal and revenge set in England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH COMES FOR THE FAT MAN by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 13, 2007

"Hill, returning to his long-running series after a crossover break (The Stranger House, 2005), produces a work as richly satisfying as steak-and-kidney pudding."
The title of Hill's latest establishes the fear that the author, with the help of some terrorist bombers, will kill off Andrew Dalziel, the gargantuan eminence of the Mid-Yorkshire CID. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BORN GUILTY by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 11, 1995

"Trust down-at-heels Joe to provide value for the money."
Three cases for raffish Luton p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1988

"Pascoe procedurals."
Hill's dark humor and crisp delivery are on solid display in this variegated collection—which features literary and occult surprises along with the more familiar sort of British, black-comic crime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILD'S PLAY by Reginald Hill
Released: Jan. 16, 1986

"But the getting-there is almost always fascinating and darkly amusing—with a colorfully varied support cast (reporters, lawyers, pub folk) and slightly new roles for Dalziel (more wise than foul this time) and Pascoe (frankly confused)."
Perhaps the best—and certainly the most elaborate—mystery in the Yorkshire series featuring Inspectors Dalziel and Pascoe: two complex cases (one in its psychology, the other in its gothic twists) that wind up overlapping in a downright baroque—yet never foolish—way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SPY'S WIFE by Reginald Hill
Released: Sept. 1, 1980

"But the scene-by-scene storytelling is fine (best by far in the Yorkshire home sequences); the dialogue is often splendidly sharp; and readers with modest expectations will find this an odd, sometimes brutish, mostly attractive mix of espionage, wifely identity crisis, and unlikely romance."
When Mollie Keatley's journalist husband of ten years disappears one day, she's told—by dour British agent Monk—that he's probably now in Moscow: "Sam Keatley's a spy, missus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH’S JEST-BOOK by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Certainly not without its rewards—bumptious Andy and elegant Peter are in top form—but if only there'd been a bit of pruning."
A 20th helping of Dalziel and Pascoe, together with at least as many subplots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD SYMPATHY by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"1026, etc.), but in a vein of unadulterated downscale farce, with the most enterprising new hero since Super Marlo Brothers."
Veteran Hill's spanking new (though already shop-soiled) hero, balding black PI Joe Sixsmith, has a meddlesome aunt; an imperious (and kidnap-prone) cat; a neighborhood (Luton, Bedfordshire) full of layabouts, petty crooks, and vigilantes; and the wildest client list this side of Jupiter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BONES AND SILENCE by Reginald Hill
Released: Aug. 14, 1990

"Pascoe novel yet—and one whose humor, keenness, and insight place him securely in the company of Ruth Rendell and P.D. James, and well ahead of most of their recent work."
Yorkshire police duo Supt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLABORATORS by Reginald Hill
Released: July 14, 1989

"In Hill's view of war, there can only be losers."
Hill takes time out from his notable series featuring detectives Dalziel and Pascoe for a longish (448 pp.) tale—first published in Britain in 1987, and very much in the mode of his WW I chronicle No Man's Land—of moral and political compromise, despair, and unexpected love in occupied France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRAITOR'S BLOOD by Reginald Hill
Released: Oct. 15, 1986

"Unsympathetic hero, frenetic doings: disappointing suspense—even if stylish reminders of Hill's considerable talent abound."
Hill, author of the fine Dalziel/Pascoe mysteries, is less sure-footed when it comes to espionage thrillers—this is his weakest effort in that genre: a hectic yet talky spy/revenge/chase tale that begins with a certain far-fetched vigor, then becomes gnarled in increasingly tiresome convolutions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO GUARDS A PRINCE by Reginald Hill
Released: June 14, 1982

"A half-appealing hybrid, then: a corny conspiracy yarn delivered with charm, irony, and laid-back savvy—more akin to Christie and Buchan than Ludlum & Co."
Hill, author of superior mysteries (A Pinch of Snuff) and so-so espionage (The Spy's Wife), now branches out into international conspiracy-suspense-with a crisp, agreeably peopled reworking of the sort of plot that was already old hat when Agatha Christie tried it on in the Twenties. Read full book review >