Search Results: "Reginald Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

AN ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING by Reginald Hill
Released: Oct. 25, 1985

"But, unlike the rather somber Clubbable Woman, this early Hill is steadily, edgily amusing—blending quiet academia satire with earthier strains of dark comedy and offbeat characterization."
Like the debut novel for Yorkshire cops Dalziel and Pascoe (A Clubbable Woman), this follow-up was originally published only in Britain (1971)—but now appears in a first US edition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEYOND THE BONE by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2000

"An early work (first published in England in 1975) that shows only fitful flashes of the wit and style that shine throughout the Dalziel-Pascoe partnership (Arms and the Women, 1999, etc.), making their series such a crime fiction favorite."
"Super!" exults Zeugma Gray, the "unambiguously plump" niece of world-class archeologist Leo Pasquino. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOOD MORNING, MIDNIGHT by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 3, 2004

"Pared down and brisker than last year's behemoth Death's Jest-book, this 21st pairing of crime fiction's most entertaining odd couple is a dazzler—Hill's best in years."
A homicide that's meant to look like a suicide, or is it the other way around? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIALOGUES OF THE DEAD by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 2, 2002

"The love story is nice, the puzzler and his puzzles not without interest, but allowing the policeman to upstage charismatic Andy and elegant Peter over the course of 424 pages was not a good move."
Fatalities result when a motorcycle rams into a tree and a car careens off a bridge, but there's no reason to construe them as homicides. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD SYMPATHY by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"1026, etc.), but in a vein of unadulterated downscale farce, with the most enterprising new hero since Super Marlo Brothers."
Veteran Hill's spanking new (though already shop-soiled) hero, balding black PI Joe Sixsmith, has a meddlesome aunt; an imperious (and kidnap-prone) cat; a neighborhood (Luton, Bedfordshire) full of layabouts, petty crooks, and vigilantes; and the wildest client list this side of Jupiter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH COMES FOR THE FAT MAN by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 13, 2007

"Hill, returning to his long-running series after a crossover break (The Stranger House, 2005), produces a work as richly satisfying as steak-and-kidney pudding."
The title of Hill's latest establishes the fear that the author, with the help of some terrorist bombers, will kill off Andrew Dalziel, the gargantuan eminence of the Mid-Yorkshire CID. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXIT LINES by Reginald Hill
Released: May 1, 1985

"The talented Mr. Hill (Deadheads, The Spy's Wife) in solid if not top form—with fine character-sketching throughout, a unifying theme of senility (Pascoe's father-in-law is also failing), and a wry, droll manner that never goes overboard."
Yorkshire's unlikely cop-team, fat boor Dalziel and wry smoothie Pascoe, make a welcome return—though this time the two never work together and there are three separate cases involved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FAIRLY DANGEROUS THING by Reginald Hill
Released: Oct. 28, 1983

"None of the plot-pizazz of other Hill creations, but plenty of crisp amusement in Joe's sexual frustrations and enforced crime-role."
Like last season's A Very Good Hater: another early Hill crime-novel (preceding his impressive Yorkshire-cop series), this one featuring a youngish British schoolteacher who gets reluctantly caught up in a heist-caper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOOD BEYOND by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 15, 1996

"The richness, depth, and emotional impact of Hill's multiple stories and their labyrinthine connections make such masters of plot as Martha Grimes and P.D. James seem positively niggardly."
Two demonstrations by animal-rights protestors have already left a security officer dead when a demonstrator at ALBA Pharmaceuticals stumbles into a pit containing another corpse, this one generations old. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CLUBBABLE WOMAN by Reginald Hill
Released: Sept. 28, 1984

"Neither as dark nor as funny as later, better Hill, with Dalziel and Pascoe (still unmarried) not yet fully-drawn—but curious and atmospheric in its moody, rugby-centered, plodding way."
Only about half of Hill's police-procedurals (featuring Yorkshire cops Dalziel and Pascoe) have been published in America, Deadheads (p. 381) the most recent arrival; and this is the first US appearance for the 1970 Dalziel-Pascoe debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SINGING THE SADNESS by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A charming postcard pendant to Joe's three more sociologically weighty adventures back home in Luton (Killing the Lawyers, 1997, etc.)."
If only the Boyling Corner Chapel Choir's bus hadn't broken down on its way to the first annual Llanffugiol Choral Festival; if only the road signs in Welsh and the few passersby hadn't been so equally unhelpful; if only they'd arrived ten minutes earlier or later at the site of Copa Cottage—then Luton p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VERY GOOD HATER by Reginald Hill
Released: Nov. 10, 1982

"A bit too twisty to be believed, and tetchy loner Goldsmith isn't quite appealing enough to carry the story along with him—but an unusual, cross-plotted little fabrication indeed, with more surprise turns than most novels twice its length."
First US printing of a 1974 effort by the author of the outstanding procedurals Ruling Passion and A Pinch of Snuff—with Hill's talents for tricky plotting and tart characterization on modestly effective display. Read full book review >