Search Results: "Reginald Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

DEADHEADS by Reginald Hill
Released: May 22, 1984

"With a nice, low-key fadeout and a botanical motif throughout: sly, tart British crime-entertainment—uncompelling, a bit overextended, but drily engaging."
Yorkshire cops Dalziel and Pascoe (A Killing Kindness, Ruling Passion) make a welcome return here—but, with the killer out-front throughout, this is more a black-comic entertainment than a murder-mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXIT LINES by Reginald Hill
Released: May 1, 1985

"The talented Mr. Hill (Deadheads, The Spy's Wife) in solid if not top form—with fine character-sketching throughout, a unifying theme of senility (Pascoe's father-in-law is also failing), and a wry, droll manner that never goes overboard."
Yorkshire's unlikely cop-team, fat boor Dalziel and wry smoothie Pascoe, make a welcome return—though this time the two never work together and there are three separate cases involved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VERY GOOD HATER by Reginald Hill
Released: Nov. 10, 1982

"A bit too twisty to be believed, and tetchy loner Goldsmith isn't quite appealing enough to carry the story along with him—but an unusual, cross-plotted little fabrication indeed, with more surprise turns than most novels twice its length."
First US printing of a 1974 effort by the author of the outstanding procedurals Ruling Passion and A Pinch of Snuff—with Hill's talents for tricky plotting and tart characterization on modestly effective display. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FAIRLY DANGEROUS THING by Reginald Hill
Released: Oct. 28, 1983

"None of the plot-pizazz of other Hill creations, but plenty of crisp amusement in Joe's sexual frustrations and enforced crime-role."
Like last season's A Very Good Hater: another early Hill crime-novel (preceding his impressive Yorkshire-cop series), this one featuring a youngish British schoolteacher who gets reluctantly caught up in a heist-caper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SINGING THE SADNESS by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A charming postcard pendant to Joe's three more sociologically weighty adventures back home in Luton (Killing the Lawyers, 1997, etc.)."
If only the Boyling Corner Chapel Choir's bus hadn't broken down on its way to the first annual Llanffugiol Choral Festival; if only the road signs in Welsh and the few passersby hadn't been so equally unhelpful; if only they'd arrived ten minutes earlier or later at the site of Copa Cottage—then Luton p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARMS AND THE WOMEN by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 14, 1999

"Plotted with all the exuberant inventiveness of Dalziel and Pascoe's best (On Beulah Height, 1998, etc.), though Hill's salute to the heroics of middle-aged womanhood ends with a flurry of melodramatics that's a shade extravagant for heroines of either sex."
Time was when Peter Pascoe's wife Ellie was a bright star active in lots of save-the-world causes, from Greenpeace to Liberata, which works on behalf of female political prisoners. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO MAN'S LAND by Reginald Hill
Released: Feb. 2, 1985

"And the result, while fitfully involving as action-adventure and always earnestly workmanlike, is neither absorbing as a three-cornered character study nor persuasive as an exploration of the deserter phenomenon."
Hill, author of superior mysteries (Ruling Passion, etc.) and so-so thrillers (The Spy's Wife, etc.), offers a much more ambitious novel this time: a tale of three WW I deserters, 1916-1918, that's fairly strong as melodrama, fairly weak when it strains for psychosexual insights and thematic resonance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH’S JEST-BOOK by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Certainly not without its rewards—bumptious Andy and elegant Peter are in top form—but if only there'd been a bit of pruning."
A 20th helping of Dalziel and Pascoe, together with at least as many subplots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLABORATORS by Reginald Hill
Released: July 14, 1989

"In Hill's view of war, there can only be losers."
Hill takes time out from his notable series featuring detectives Dalziel and Pascoe for a longish (448 pp.) tale—first published in Britain in 1987, and very much in the mode of his WW I chronicle No Man's Land—of moral and political compromise, despair, and unexpected love in occupied France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD SYMPATHY by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"1026, etc.), but in a vein of unadulterated downscale farce, with the most enterprising new hero since Super Marlo Brothers."
Veteran Hill's spanking new (though already shop-soiled) hero, balding black PI Joe Sixsmith, has a meddlesome aunt; an imperious (and kidnap-prone) cat; a neighborhood (Luton, Bedfordshire) full of layabouts, petty crooks, and vigilantes; and the wildest client list this side of Jupiter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1988

"Pascoe procedurals."
Hill's dark humor and crisp delivery are on solid display in this variegated collection—which features literary and occult surprises along with the more familiar sort of British, black-comic crime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BORN GUILTY by Reginald Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 11, 1995

"Trust down-at-heels Joe to provide value for the money."
Three cases for raffish Luton p.i. Read full book review >