Search Results: "Reid Hoffman"


BOOK REVIEW

ABBIE HOFFMAN by Marty Jezer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Hoffman—and a whole doomed, inspired era—emerges vividly in this cleareyed, richly detailed work. (Photographs—24 pages b&w- -not seen.)"
A thoughtful, solidly researched biography of the wildly creative and iconoclastic yippie, portraying Hoffman as a fresh force in American political culture—and as a man ultimately sabotaged by bipolar disorder (manic-depression), which drove him to extremes and probably led to his suicide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 14, 2012

"Motivational, mildly convoluted pep talk on career planning and the power of connections."
A hugely successful Internet entrepreneur imparts the wisdom behind establishing and cultivating a successful business career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Alienation of Courtney Hoffman by Brady G. Stefani
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Chock-full of sharp tonal contrasts, this tale should appeal to readers with a hunger for alien adventure and an understanding of how it feels to be considered crazy."
A debut novel fuses a serious issue—the stigma of mental illness—with sci-fi to chronicle a girl's unusual coming-of-age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUBWAY MOUSE by Barbara Reid
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"Seen from mouse-eye level, the grimy, wonderfully detailed setting adds a tongue-in-cheek air, as well as making a properly vivid backdrop for this intrepid venture into the unknown. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Bits of real litter and found bric-a-brac in Reid's plasticine subterranean scenes add an air of authenticity to this grand tale of a mouse who leaves his cozy subway station nest to find the fabled "Tunnel's End." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZOE'S WINDY DAY by Barbara Reid
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1991

One of four simultaneously published wordless board books concerning an appealingly sturdy child's outings in different kinds of weather (in the others, Zoe enjoys sunny, snowy, and rainy days). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PICTURE A TREE by Barbara Reid
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"For Arbor Day and every day. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Master of Plasticine Reid returns with a celebration of trees and the people who love them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PARTY by Barbara Reid
Released: April 1, 1999

"A treat. (Picture book. 4-9)"
A girl and her sister start off rather glumly in the back seat of the car, leaving all their friends behind, because they are off to a family party. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOX WALKED ALONE by Barbara Reid
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"The quality of the wry, understated text and the fascinating, unusual illustrations make this version stand out in a crowded sea of Noah's Ark interpretations. (Picture book/religion. 3-6)"
The appealing cover of this Noah's Ark story shows the dapper Fox strutting along, turning his head toward the reader to smile invitingly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWO BY TWO by Barbara Reid
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1993

"Music included. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Adopting the verse scheme of the traditional song, Reid recounts the building of Noah's Ark and writes a new couplet for each number up to ten (``And in came the animals six by six,/Pandas and penguins, all in a mix''). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 4, 2004

"Salutary arguments abound here for those tired of homegrown complainers about high taxes and states' rights. A sturdy companion to Will Hutton's Declaration of Interdependence (2003), written with an eye to an American audience."
Winston Churchill's dream is fulfilled: a former "coal-and-steel trading arrangement" has grown from common market into globally powerful international community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Serviceable, but readers seeking a more fluent overview should turn to Bruce Lincoln's Conquest of a Continent (1994)."
From the former Kiev correspondent for The Economist, a portrait of indigenous Siberian cultures all but destroyed by European expansionism and Stalinist suppression. Read full book review >