Search Results: "René Knecht"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 12, 2012

"A thought-provoking sales alternative that may appeal to forward-thinking sales managers."
A debut philosophical treatise on sellingthat challenges commonly accepted sales principles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

A WALL IN PALESTINE by René Backmann
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 2, 2010

"An impassioned text that combines polemic incitement with assiduous geographical insight."
A French journalist takes a less-than-dispassionate look at a barrier constructed by Israel and concludes it's less for security than a land grab in the West Bank. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DREAM ROOM by Marcel Möring
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2002

"A fine companion to Möring's longer novels, and probably his most accomplished yet."
A family borne aloft, then gradually destroyed by the experience (and the enigma) of flight is portrayed with compassionate insight in this terse, if intermittently obscure, novella by the Dutch author of The Great Longing (1995) and In Babylon (2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FADING COLOURS by René Chalem
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 2, 2014

"A fine first novel from a writer with affecting wisdom.
"
Chalem, in his debut novella, looks at the role and limitations of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1997

"Alternately infuriating and engrossing, this messy little book is worth reading for its scattering of imaginative, challenging, and fruitful insights."
A literary critic explores ``mimetic desire'' and the sacred in Dostoevsky's novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MACHINE by René Belletto
Released: Nov. 23, 1993

"And most readers, unless they've read Belletto's curious anti-thriller Eclipse (1990), will scarcely notice the muted ending."
What if an eminent psychiatrist—in order to get a closer look inside the mind of his showcase psychopathic patient—used a gizmo he'd cooked up at home to introject his own mind into the patient's body, while the patient, finding his own mind transferred to the psychiatrist's body, took off on a rampage? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RELIEF MAP by Rosalie Knecht
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 27, 2016

"A thoughtful novel that resists easy moralizing."
When the hunt for a fugitive causes police to institute a lockdown, everyday tensions in a quiet Pennsylvania town threaten to boil over in Knecht's atmospheric debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 2012

"Mild chills in either language. (Short stories. 10-12)"
"La Llorona" and other traditional bugaboos from Mexican-American lore find modern young victims in this bilingual set of South Texas tales. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 2005

"A winner all-around. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Humorous illustrations, marked by oversized heads, mildly Cubist perspectives and rich pastels, combine with a wry narrative tone to fashion a marvelous look not simply at names shared by boys and girls, but also the transformation required of Spanish-speaking children as they remake themselves into English speakers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICHOLAS by René Goscinny
Kirkus Star
by René Goscinny, illustrated by Jean-Jacques Sempé, translated by Anthea Bell
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"At least one sequel is scheduled. (Fiction. 9-11)"
A favorite in France for decades, these 19 tongue-in-cheek tales of daily life as seen through the eyes of an uncritical young everylad will elicit bursts of laughter from children and adults alike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ISLAND OF CUNDEAMOR by René Vazquez Diaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

This bracingly bitter novel is set in eponymous fictional territory: an "island" located within mainland Florida, where Cuban émigrés fall in and out of love and trouble, fend off or join forces with the shadowy, Mafia-like "Crabb Company" (a reputed drug and assassination-for-hire empire), and debate whether exile in an alien sanctuary is preferable to facing continual injustice and peril in one's homeland. Read full book review >