Search Results: "Richard Davenport-Hines"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 2012

"The book has all the inevitability and pathos of Greek tragedy, but by maintaining the personal dimension, the author transforms a narrative of monumental hubris meeting human error into a haunting story of real, intersecting lives on a collision course with destiny."
A moving account of the people who sailed into maritime history on the doomed Titanic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 2006

"Informed and sympathetic portrait of a genius struggling to complete his life's work, no matter what."
An admiring, even loving, look at the dying Marcel Proust's final six months, with many glances backward (and sometimes askance) at the novelist's family and friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A well-drawn, comprehensive account of a troubling subject."
A British historian trains an eye on the vast history of human experience with illicit drugs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUDEN by Richard Davenport-Hines
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 19, 1996

"The book, in effect, prevents a placid understanding of a man whom perhaps nobody understood—an astringent but welcome service. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
British critic and author Davenport-Hines (The MacMillans, not reviewed, etc.) brings very English gusto and insight to this biography of the poet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNIVERSAL MAN by Richard Davenport-Hines
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"An admiring and nuanced book filled with insights into this scholar and man of action in all his complexity."
An unconventional biography of the brilliant economist who shaped British public life in the 20th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO WAY BUT GENTLENESSE by Richard Hines
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A delightful story of a boy, his birds, and his pursuit of knowledge in spite of society's dictates."
How catching and training a kestrel changed the life of a young British boy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURA INGALLS WILDER'S FAIRY POEMS by Laura Ingalls Wilder
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A sweet confection for fans of fairies or the author. (Poetry. 6-10)"
A slim, pretty volume containing five poems composed by Wilder in 1915 for a newspaper column; a protestation that fairies do indeed exist written in the following year; and a new introduction by Hines (I Remember Laura, 1994, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE OF MANY GODS by Kiana Davenport
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2006

"Davenport has skill, but her novel falters."
Davenport's sometimes evocative, often rambling third novel (Song of the Exile, 1999, etc.) is a portrait of a Hawaiian woman struggling against poverty and loneliness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAINTER by Will Davenport
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 2003

"Although the contemporary story becomes an annoying distraction, Davenport does right by Rembrandt and his genius—and that gives his fantasy a glow of its own."
Rembrandt in England, locked in a fierce struggle with the poet Andrew Marvell for artistic preeminence—and the attentions of a beautiful woman: all in this outing from Davenport (a.k.a. British thriller writer James Long: Silence and Shadows, 2001, etc.). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

APPRECIATIONS
by Gregory McNamee

“Men are often taken, like rabbits, by the ears,” observed the British literary critic F.L. Lucas. He added, “And though the tongue has no bones, it can break millions of them.” Yes, it can: we live in an age of broken bones, one in which the power-hungry are grabbing at—well, ears, if nothing else, by which we ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SINNER’S TALE by Will Davenport
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2005

"The medieval episodes, like campfire tales, are enjoyable in their own right; otherwise, Davenport's latest is a mess."
Could a knight from olde England have an antiwar message for today's British government? Anything's possible in Davenport's mixed-up second novel. Read full book review >