Search Results: "Richard Dowden"


BOOK REVIEW

AFRICA by Richard Dowden
NON-FICTION
Released: March 16, 2009

"A remarkably full-bodied and frank discussion of Africa's place in the world."
The director of the Royal African Society offers an ambitious, roundly informative and still intimate look at sub-Saharan Africa's turbulent road in the modern era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NATURE
Released: June 30, 1994

"Index of plants; subject index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Poisonous plants—garden, wayside, and exotic—are meticulously described and exquisitely illustrated in full color and b&w by a botanical artist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONSIDER THE LILIES by John Paterson
FRIENDS AND SCHOOL
Released: Sept. 25, 1986

"Plant lore gleaned from botanists and Biblical scholarship is presented in italics: the 'lilies of the fields' were probably anemones; and myrrh may refer either to the gum of the Commiphona or of the rock rose; etc. A visual delight which may find an audience with both Bible students and naturalists."
The history and symbolism of 39 plants of the Bible, presented with related Bible texts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BECAUSE by Richard Torrey
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2011

"But still, because or no because, it's a pleasure to see Jack learning to negotiate his way through the world, from longing questions to innocent answers that reveal far too much plain honesty. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Since Torrey's wobbly, irresistible artwork tells the whole story, there is no reason to ask any explicit questions—such as, "Why is half the cake eaten?" or, "Why are you covered in Band-Aids?"—but young Jack always has the answer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALMOST by Richard Torrey
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"This is a sweet, tongue-in-cheek look at growing up that will reassure the youngest sufferers of youth that they are not alone. (Picture book. 4-8)"
For those children who just cannot wait to grow up comes a tale that emphasizes their growing pains and the importance of their families' support. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN ELEPHANT IN THE BACKYARD by Richard Sobol
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2004

"He isn't the first to visit a village where people and elephants cohabit, but he offers a closer, more intimate portrait than readers will find in Jeremy C. Schmidt's In the Village of the Elephants (1994), or Roland Smith's In the Forest with Elephants (1998). (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)"
Young readers may never complain about feeding or cleaning up after the dog again once they've met Wan Pen, a four-year-old pet/sibling/working animal belonging to a family in a Thai village. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAINT FRANCIS AND THE WOLF by Richard Egielski
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"The attractive design includes decorated borders around the illustrations and an old-fashioned typeface in brown against beige backgrounds with the look of parchment or vellum. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-8)"
Caldecott Medalist Egielski focuses on one incident in the life of St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT'S WRONG WITH THIS BOOK? by Richard McGuire
Released: March 1, 1997

"The illustrations are dandy, with compositions that must be pored over even though they never intertwine with the text; this is a collection of intriguing pictures rather than story carried and complemented by images. (Picture book. 5+)"
McGuire (What Goes Around Comes Around, 1995, etc.) sweeps out his graphic arts playhouse for a scrapbook of conundrums, collages, and shadow plays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND by Richard McGuire
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Good, simple fun on a grand, global scale. (Picture book. 5- 10)"
McGuire (Night Becomes Day, 1994, etc.) uses retro-style graphic illustrations to tell a circular tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE by Richard McGuire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"A gorgeous symphony."
Illustrator McGuire (What's Wrong With This Book, 1997, etc.) once again frames a fixed space across the millennia.Read full book review >