Search Results: "Richard Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LACEY CONFESSION by Richard Greener
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Too much filler makes for a humdrum thriller."
Veteran tracker Walter Sherman finds himself slogging neck-deep through some of the 20th century's best-kept secrets in this second novel in Greener's "The Locator" series (The Knowland Retribution, 2006). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"Hearty, but not The Heart of the Matter."
A companion story for Greene's The Little Red Fire Engine (published last year and also illustrated in color by Dorothy Craigie) takes a similar theme, though with different characters and setting and chronicles a London grocer's conquest of bankruptcy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CURSED by Victoria Greene
Released: March 13, 2012

"Young and old readers can sink their teeth into this one."
In first-time author Greene's paranormal young-adult thriller, Ethan survives a beast's attack only to realize that he's slowly turning into a werewolf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 13, 2002

"There's always something afoot in these pages, but the atmosphere bespeaks sweet torpor as Greene pursues an infusion of pleasure, a modest slice of history, an honest sense of place."
The story of yet another French country house and its travails in the hands of its new, non-French owners, this time told in a relaxed, un-selfconscious, and observant fashion by poet Greene (American Spirituals, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL SUMMER LONG by Bob Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1993

"Rose-tinted, high-rolling male wish-fulfillment: the answer to every man's mid-life crisis, but terminally tedious as a novel."
A treacly fiction debut from veteran journalist and Chicago Tribune columnist Greene (Hang Time, 1991, etc.): the story of three former high-school chums who decide to take a last summer off together after attending their 25th reunion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Buried Secrets by Hunter Greene

"Compelling if at times confusing tale of trauma, its attendant issues, and the prisoner psyche."
Five years into his 23-year prison sentence, a prisoner ponders his life in this debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DENISE LEVERTOV by Dana Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 30, 2012

"This compelling study deftly blends personal details with consideration of the poet's craft."
A major poet of the 20th century receives her first biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HE WAS A MIDWESTERN BOY ON HIS OWN by Bob Greene
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1991

"Occasionally, his prose steers into the pious or the sentimental (dying children, the lost joys of youth), but for the most part this is a softly philosophical, gently humane, highly entertaining harvesting from one of America's very best columnists."
Another greatly engaging collection of Greene's Chicago Tribune and Esquire columns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1961

"All in all, it is expectedly fragmentary and unexpectedly revealing, and of primary concern to those who are more seriously interested in Greene- the writer."
This slim book consists of two journals which Greene kept on two trips to Africa- in 1941 and in 1959. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOSER TAKES ALL by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1955

"A pleasant diversion- and at this price- anybody can play."
Based on a shooting script (as was The Fallen Idol a few years ago) this is one of the works Greene has tagged as "entertainments". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT THE DEAD REMEMBER by Harlan Greene
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Even so, his evocation of growing up gay in Charleston is memorable."
Greene's second novel (Why We Never Danced the Charleston, 1984)—about coming of age as a homosexual in the South and returning in the AIDS-afflicted 80's—can be episodic and hurried but also elegiac and offbeat as the story of an ugly duckling who awakens sexually and transforms himself. Read full book review >