Search Results: "Richard Kluger"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2011

"An accurate narrative, but the lack of nuance makes for a painful account that will keep readers gnashing their teeth throughout."
Intense history of a vicious confrontation between whites and Indians in 1850s Washington Territory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 28, 1996

"Put this in your pipe and prepare for a richly rewarding read."
In this sturdy if sometimes long-winded account of tobacco in America, high-toned moralizing on the plight of the ``millions enslaved by nicotine'' accompanies level-headed analysis of the evils of cigarettes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Vivid though the pageantry is, the Sheriff himself is too noble for his own good; his ethics prove predictable and tedious, and spoil an otherwise impressive saga."
Taking full advantage of the poetic license that fiction affords, award-winning social-historian Kluger returns with a sixth novel (Un-American Activities, 1982, etc.), painting the popular legend of Robin Hood and his nemesis in an intriguing, entirely different light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INDELIBLE INK by Richard Kluger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A book of American history for all, but lawyers and journalists will especially appreciate it."
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian looks back at the 1730s, when a single court case established the first step toward freedom of the press. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 9, 2007

"A brilliant book, likely to be for some time the last word on how the American map evolved."
A Pulitzer Prize-winner comprehensively documents America's expansion—one audacious land swindle, one gunpoint accession, one bloody conquest after another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"An entertaining book of popular psychology."
Time editor at large Kluger (The Sibling Effect: What the Bonds Among Brothers and Sisters Reveal About Us, 2011, etc.) reveals recent scientific findings and age-old chestnuts about every possible breed of narcissist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST DAYS OF SUMMER by Steve Kluger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

The late Ring Lardner might just be reading now over our shoulders, for Kluger's epistolary novel of 1940s Brooklyn baseball is right up his genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREEDOM STONE by Jeffrey Kluger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Young readers will feel for Lillie and not be comforted by hope in magical African stones and bread baking. (author's note) (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
Thirteen-year-old Lillie has lived her whole life in slavery on the Greenfog plantation in South Carolina. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: March 1, 2008

"The innovative format works well in relating the multiple love stories, and the story ought to appeal to a wide range of readers. (Fiction. 12+)"
How many novels have such a cast of characters: A Red Sox addict who writes letters to his dead mother; his gay American-born Chinese "brother"; a love interest whose role model is Jacqueline Kennedy and who's the daughter of the ambassador to Mexico; a young boy who thinks Mary Poppins is real; and a father romancing his son's school adviser? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Scientific triumph by a medical hero, described with admiration and lucidity. (Photos, not seen)"
A mighty medical event occurred half a century ago, when the curse of polio—of youthful paralysis and suffocating death—was conquered. It was then that the vaccine developed by Dr. Salk was pronounced safe and effective and mass inoculations began. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"An entertaining, enlightening and helpful handbook for familial relations from an author who's been through them all."
An in-depth exploration of the bonds between siblings and their surprisingly large influence on how we develop. Read full book review >