Search Results: "Richard Peck"


BOOK REVIEW

NEW YORK TIME by Richard Peck
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1981

"Overall: lots of fine witchy humor, but not enough motor power to carry a familiar tale over the top of sentiment."
Through the traumas of mid-westerner Barbara Renfrew, class of '65, Peck takes zippy aim at some very broad targets: the dear dead days of college sororities, felt skirts, and garter belts; middle-exec Chicago suburbia; lower-exec Mafia digs in New Jersey; and moldering Manhattan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOICES AFTER MIDNIGHT by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1989

"A quick-moving, neatly plotted time fantasy, with thoroughly likable characters, bantering dialogue, and just the right touch of romance."
Chad—a frank, ingenuous 14-year-old Californian—tells what happens when his family rents an old New York town house on East 73rd for two weeks one summer: farewell to beaches and barbeques, hello Central Park and—after slipping into several other times—the Blizzard of 1888. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECRETS OF THE SHOPPING MALL by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1979

"Worse, Teresa and Barnie have no personalities either and their thoughts and conversations no vitality."
On an impulse, unhappy loner Teresa rescues brainy Barnie from a mean gang in their inner city junior high school—and the two flee to a suburban jungle that proves just as dangerous. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GHOST BELONGED TO ME by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: April 28, 1975

"But Peck throws in enough scary moments to prove that he'd be a winner in any campfire storytelling session, and in that spirit he will keep his audience giggling and just a little frightened at the same time."
"There are several opinions that people hold regarding ghosts, and not one of them would clinch an argument." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATHER FIGURE by Richard Peck
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1978

"Jim tells the story in a clipped first person that reflects his veneer of cool; it also reflects a certain slickness on Peck's part—but not enough to invalidate his generally well-drawn relationships."
Jim Atwater doesn't show much reaction to the suicide of his terminally ill mother, but he does, insidiously, grow more and more possessively protective toward his little brother when the two boys are left alone in the large, fading Brooklyn Heights home of their proper stiff-lipped grandmother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESS ASHLEY by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 15, 1987

"Another winner."
Here, Chelsea narrates the events in her sophomore and junior years, when she modeled herself on Ashley—lovely, rich, and apparently self-possessed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON'T LOOK AND IT WON'T HURT by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 10, 1972

"It won't hurt if you read it for the humor, but don't look for any hidden profundity."
Life on the wrong side of the tracks when the tracks are in Claypitts the "Pearl of the Prairie" isn't much to brag about, and Carol, with her ready self-deprecating wit would be the first to admit it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARE YOU IN THE HOUSE ALONE? by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"As we expect this to be read as a chiller rather than a case study, we'll rate it medium cool—fast-paced and frighteningly accurate but without the quality of inevitability that keeps one awake after lights out."
Gail Osborn's ordeal begins with an obscene note pinned to her school locker, builds until she is raped and beaten by her best friend's disturbed steady, and is intensified throughout by her isolation—first, when family, friends, and counselors are indifferent or incapable of reacting to the anonymous threats, and, later, when a sneering police chief and timid, hypocritical townspeople dissuade her from prosecuting a boy from a prominent family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THOSE SUMMER GIRLS I NEVER MET by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1988

"The setting isn't well-realized: both ship and ports of call come across as painted backdrops; but the lively cast more than compensates."
Drew Wingate feels as if his big summer plans have been blown out of the water but finds instead that they've just changed course. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REMEMBERING THE GOOD TIMES by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 5, 1985

"Still, that's certainly preferable to a facile psychological case history; and the whole account has an air of firmly planted, strongly felt reality."
One of Peck's more serious young novels, this is the story of three friends—four, if you count Kate's tart great-grandmother Polly, who completes their daily gathering for cards and conversation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SEASON OF GIFTS by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Pitch-perfect prose, laced with humor and poignancy, strong characterization and a clear development of the theme of gifts one person can offer make this one of Peck's best novels yet—and that's saying something. (Historical fiction. 10 & up)"
According to 12-year-old Bob, "We Barnharts had moved in next door to a haunted house, if a house can be haunted by a living being." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE QUARTERS DEAD by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 28, 2010

"Probably more for fans of Cecily Von Ziegesar than Lois Duncan. (Horror. 12 & up)"
Self-described follower Kerry ("I was always a step behind. I lived back there") finds herself in over her head when she is unexpectedly adopted by the three coolest girls in school. Read full book review >