Search Results: "Richard Peck"


BOOK REVIEW

DON'T LOOK AND IT WON'T HURT by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 10, 1972

"It won't hurt if you read it for the humor, but don't look for any hidden profundity."
Life on the wrong side of the tracks when the tracks are in Claypitts the "Pearl of the Prairie" isn't much to brag about, and Carol, with her ready self-deprecating wit would be the first to admit it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARE YOU IN THE HOUSE ALONE? by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"As we expect this to be read as a chiller rather than a case study, we'll rate it medium cool—fast-paced and frighteningly accurate but without the quality of inevitability that keeps one awake after lights out."
Gail Osborn's ordeal begins with an obscene note pinned to her school locker, builds until she is raped and beaten by her best friend's disturbed steady, and is intensified throughout by her isolation—first, when family, friends, and counselors are indifferent or incapable of reacting to the anonymous threats, and, later, when a sneering police chief and timid, hypocritical townspeople dissuade her from prosecuting a boy from a prominent family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRINCESS ASHLEY by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 15, 1987

"Another winner."
Here, Chelsea narrates the events in her sophomore and junior years, when she modeled herself on Ashley—lovely, rich, and apparently self-possessed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOSTS I HAVE BEEN by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1977

"Never one for false modesty (on page one Blossom bills herself as 'the most famous girl in two countries'), Peck's heroine proves to be such a redoubtable 'Seeress' that despite the extravagant self-promotion, she just about manages to live up to the hype."
So closely does this follow The Ghost Belonged to Me (1975) that at times Peck's sequel on Second Sight verges on déja vu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 9, 1977

"Young readers might recognize every detail of Toby's vigil—but, as Peck doesn't make them share the terrors, their emotional involvement is minimal."
Peck's first story for younger children takes Toby through a scary summer night at his grandmother's Victorian house. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THROUGH A BRIEF DARKNESS by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 19, 1973

In his third YA novel Peck wisely relinquishes any pretense to relevance or depth and comes out with a tightly drawn romantic melodrama about sixteen year-old Karen, protected daughter of a big time crook, who is suddenly pulled out of boarding school and hustled off to "relatives" in England, there to discover gradually that she has actually been kidnapped by ruthless members of a rival syndicate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REMEMBERING THE GOOD TIMES by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 5, 1985

"Still, that's certainly preferable to a facile psychological case history; and the whole account has an air of firmly planted, strongly felt reality."
One of Peck's more serious young novels, this is the story of three friends—four, if you count Kate's tart great-grandmother Polly, who completes their daily gathering for cards and conversation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THOSE SUMMER GIRLS I NEVER MET by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1988

"The setting isn't well-realized: both ship and ports of call come across as painted backdrops; but the lively cast more than compensates."
Drew Wingate feels as if his big summer plans have been blown out of the water but finds instead that they've just changed course. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMANDA/MIRANDA by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: March 11, 1980

"All in all, a gorgeously romantic, implausible affair comfy as eiderdown."
Peck has unearthed one of the hoariest of chimney-corner romantic devices—the wobbly course of love and intrigue when two young things of diverse origins and temperament look exactly alike and cross destinies; and he displays it here in late-Edwardian satin, with agile prose and a straight face. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SEASON OF GIFTS by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Pitch-perfect prose, laced with humor and poignancy, strong characterization and a clear development of the theme of gifts one person can offer make this one of Peck's best novels yet—and that's saying something. (Historical fiction. 10 & up)"
According to 12-year-old Bob, "We Barnharts had moved in next door to a haunted house, if a house can be haunted by a living being." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE QUARTERS DEAD by Richard Peck
FICTION
Released: Oct. 28, 2010

"Probably more for fans of Cecily Von Ziegesar than Lois Duncan. (Horror. 12 & up)"
Self-described follower Kerry ("I was always a step behind. I lived back there") finds herself in over her head when she is unexpectedly adopted by the three coolest girls in school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAIR WEATHER by Richard Peck
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Not up to its promise, but good fun nonetheless. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Into the quiet, routinized farm life of 14-year-old Rosie, older sister Lottie, and younger brother Buster comes a letter from Aunt Euterpe in Chicago, inviting them to the 1893 World's Fair. Read full book review >