Search Results: "Richard Rayner"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ELEPHANT by Richard Rayner
Released: March 1, 1992

"At first he comes close to scoring, but as his account degenerates—becomes long-winded, confused, even tedious- -it's ultimately easy to say no."
A Yorkshire journalist finds himself overdrawn at the Bank of Morality as he competes with the mythic image of his lying, boozing, womanizing father; Rayner (Los Angeles Without a Map, 1989) dishes out loaded material with surprisingly little impact. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 23, 2009

"The material would have benefited from a wider focus, but Rayner delivers a lurid, low-down portrait of Los Angeles sure to appeal to readers interested in the real L.A. confidential."
Noir-tinged portrait of the sick soul of America's Promised Land. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLOUD SKETCHER by Richard Rayner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 2001

"Rayner (Murder Book, 1997, etc.) captures the vaunting spirit of skyscrapers and their creators with delicacy and freshness. Too bad he fell back on hackneyed plot devices."
An atmospheric, if ultimately overwrought, story of love and architecture in war-torn Finland and 1920s New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER BOOK by Richard Rayner
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 22, 1997

"Not a bad try, but not the big one Rayner was obviously aiming for."
An ambitious and dauntingly convoluted noir-derived thriller from the author of The Elephant (1992) and the penitential memoir The Blue Suit (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLUE SUIT by Richard Rayner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Fictional characters can be indulged, but real penance should be private."
True confessions by a Cambridge alum whose success in literature and love belies a youth of forged checks and stolen first editions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 21, 2002

"A zesty mix of Death of a Salesman, My Ántonia, and a Bogart film."
British novelist Rayner (The Cloud Stretcher, 2001) offers a painstakingly researched history of a Depression-era confidence game that also explains why people fall for such schemes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL’S WIND by Richard Rayner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Expertly judged work, executed with an apparent relish for all things noir."
A man learns that the game is up, in a thriller as sharp as a new laser print of Double Indemnity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOLOMON CROCODILE by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 20, 2011

"Light and entertaining fun. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Solomon Crocodile annoys and irritates the other creatures in the swamp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABIGAIL by Catherine Rayner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A richly illustrated story that could benefit from better page design and crisper storytelling. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Gorgeous, lush illustrations strengthen a somewhat loosely connected story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEAR WHO SHARED by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Simple and sublime. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Three forest animals square off over a juicy piece of fruit but avert conflict. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GARTH PIG STEALS THE SHOW by Mary Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Told with Rayner's usual brisk good humor and nicely illustrated with deftly drawn, lively, and cheerfully resourceful pigs: a funny story with just enough suspense, sure to star with groups and independent readers alike. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A welcome return for little Garth and his big family; here, they've formed a band and are in concert with the help of a ringer, a lavender-gowned sousaphonist easily recognized (though not by the Pigs) as a wolf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRIS FINDS HIS FEET by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2008

"A lovely lesson delivered with a deft touch. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A grandfather hare takes a frisky youngster on an odyssey of (self-)discovery. Read full book review >