Search Results: "Richard Restak"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 26, 2006

"A good summary of current research, along with some lurid alarm-sounding."
Veteran neuroscience popularizer and psychiatrist Restak (Poe's Heart and the Mountain Climber, 2004, etc.) approaches with both excitement and caution a decade's worth of brain-imaging discoveries linking particular nerve circuits to complex behaviors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"Never again will endlessly poring over a crossword or Sudoku puzzle be considered a waste of time."
Neuroscientist Restak (Think Smart: A Neuroscientist's Prescription for Improving Your Brain's Performance, 2009, etc.) and puzzle-designer Kim provide mental activities, and the reasoning behind them, for brain-performance enhancement. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 23, 2004

"Certainly a lot of useful information, but a small voice must still ask: Doesn't writing a book touting today's world as the Big-Time Anxiety Age count as a bit of hype in itself?"
Are you anxious to the point you're incapacitated and woefully unwell? Then this one's for you. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Overall, Restak has managed a remarkable sweep of information in a short book: proving that if you lay down your anatomical landmarks in advance, you can lead the reader to some very exciting and promising brain(land)scapes. (15 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
An orthodox approach that works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECEPTORS by Richard M. Restak
NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 1994

The bland title to psychiatrist/neurologist Restak's latest (The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own, 1991, etc.) refers to the fascinating subject of drugs and the brain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Cocktail party conversation—light and lively, but ultimately disappointing."
Restak (The Mind, 1988; The Brain, 1984, etc.) rests on his laurels a bit with these brief, breezy essays on technological innovations, ethical issues, and as-yet-unsolved mysteries in the fast-developing field of neurology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 1994

"Some new wine, but mostly old brew in old bottles."
Neuropsychiatrist Restak (The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own, 1991, etc.) tackles age-old questions about the nature of free will, thought, emotion, and creativity in the process of explicating the theory of the modular brain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAM THE ASTROCHIMP by Richard Hilliard
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

Paying tribute to the "first truly intelligent being" in space, Hilliard traces the flight and later life of the chimpanzee sent aloft in a Mercury capsule in 1961. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLIM AND JIM by Richard Egielski
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2002

"A heavily battered typeface adds to the generally raffish air of this droll, action-packed (and very silly) modern fable. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Channeling Aesop through Charles Dickens, Egielski (Locust Pocus! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAVERY by Richard Watkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

Contradictory statements, sweeping generalizations, and a general lack of focus make this history of slavery more an eye-glazer than an eye-opener. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADELINA’S WHALES by Richard Sobol
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2003

"Accessible on many levels, it gives a personal face to conservation. (Nonfiction. 4-10)"
Photojournalist Sobol contrasts ten-year-old Adelina Mayoral's life in a Mexican fishing village with that of the gray whales that spend three months in the water just offshore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE MAGIC BALLS by Richard Egielski
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 31, 2000

"Children can ponder further adventures, as Rudy seems to do when he purchases the balls on payday. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Once again, the team that created Buz (1995) and Jazper (1998) hangs imaginative, eye-catching art on a slight story line. Read full book review >