Search Results: "Richard Restak"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 26, 2006

"A good summary of current research, along with some lurid alarm-sounding."
Veteran neuroscience popularizer and psychiatrist Restak (Poe's Heart and the Mountain Climber, 2004, etc.) approaches with both excitement and caution a decade's worth of brain-imaging discoveries linking particular nerve circuits to complex behaviors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"Never again will endlessly poring over a crossword or Sudoku puzzle be considered a waste of time."
Neuroscientist Restak (Think Smart: A Neuroscientist's Prescription for Improving Your Brain's Performance, 2009, etc.) and puzzle-designer Kim provide mental activities, and the reasoning behind them, for brain-performance enhancement. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 23, 2004

"Certainly a lot of useful information, but a small voice must still ask: Doesn't writing a book touting today's world as the Big-Time Anxiety Age count as a bit of hype in itself?"
Are you anxious to the point you're incapacitated and woefully unwell? Then this one's for you. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECEPTORS by Richard M. Restak
NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 1994

The bland title to psychiatrist/neurologist Restak's latest (The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own, 1991, etc.) refers to the fascinating subject of drugs and the brain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Overall, Restak has managed a remarkable sweep of information in a short book: proving that if you lay down your anatomical landmarks in advance, you can lead the reader to some very exciting and promising brain(land)scapes. (15 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
An orthodox approach that works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 1994

"Some new wine, but mostly old brew in old bottles."
Neuropsychiatrist Restak (The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own, 1991, etc.) tackles age-old questions about the nature of free will, thought, emotion, and creativity in the process of explicating the theory of the modular brain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Cocktail party conversation—light and lively, but ultimately disappointing."
Restak (The Mind, 1988; The Brain, 1984, etc.) rests on his laurels a bit with these brief, breezy essays on technological innovations, ethical issues, and as-yet-unsolved mysteries in the fast-developing field of neurology. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

APPRECIATIONS
by Gregory McNamee

“Men are often taken, like rabbits, by the ears,” observed the British literary critic F.L. Lucas. He added, “And though the tongue has no bones, it can break millions of them.” Yes, it can: we live in an age of broken bones, one in which the power-hungry are grabbing at—well, ears, if nothing else, by which we ...


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BLOG POST

WINTER WINNERS
by Julie Danielson

It may not be winter yet, but the cozy, winter picture books are already on shelves. I’ve two on my mind today, Snow Scene and When the Moon Comes, that make me long to see snowflakes.

I’m really glad that long-time editor Richard Jackson decided to start penning picture books. He has written four thus far (Have a Look, Says ...


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BOOK REVIEW

MY DOG, BOB by Richard Torrey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Quiet and clever, just like Bob. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A little boy narrates a story about his dog, Bob, who can do amazing things around the house but can't accomplish standard dog tricks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS BOOK JUST ATE MY DOG by Richard Byrne
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Misses the mark. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A carnivorous book invites readers to participate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIFE OF RICE by Richard Sobol
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Using rice as a lens, this book delivers an engaging snapshot of Thailand and its people. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
Many rice farmers all over Thailand still plant and harvest by hand, with the help of family members and such animals as water buffalo and elephants. Read full book review >