Search Results: "Richard Saul"


BOOK REVIEW

ADHD DOES NOT EXIST by Richard Saul
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2014

"A provocative, valuable guide for parents, school personnel and medical practitioners who deal with individuals showing symptoms routinely attributed to ADHD."
Respected American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology fellow Saul makes the controversial claim that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is routinely misdiagnosed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 16, 1991

"Some substance submerged in a flood of format. (Line drawings.)"
Architect, graphic designer, consultant to industry, and purveyor of information packaging, Wurman now attempts to teach us how to teach and how to take teaching. Read full book review >

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APPRECIATIONS
by Gregory McNamee

“Men are often taken, like rabbits, by the ears,” observed the British literary critic F.L. Lucas. He added, “And though the tongue has no bones, it can break millions of them.” Yes, it can: we live in an age of broken bones, one in which the power-hungry are grabbing at—well, ears, if nothing else, by which we ...


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BOOK REVIEW

MIDNIGHT VOICES by John Saul
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 2001

"Rosemary's Remake, with a richly entertaining demonic payoff."
Saul (The Manhattan Hunt Club, 2001, etc.) rings some changes on a classic horror storyline. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLLECTED STORIES by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"One for the permanent shelf."
With the passing of Eudora Welty, our only living Nobel laureate remains virtually unchallenged as America's greatest writer of fiction (Roth, Mailer, Updike, Oates, and perhaps a handful of others). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BECOMING RICHARD PRYOR by Scott Saul
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Better written and more thoughtful than David and Joe Henry's Furious Cool (2013). The latter remains worth reading, but this book is the place to start."
Smart blend of social history and biography centering on one of the funniest—and most tragic—people of our time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING TO REMEMBER ME BY by Saul Bellow
Released: Oct. 3, 1991

In 1989, both in paperback original, appeared Bellow's hundred-page-or-so novella A Theft, followed a few months later by The Bellarosa Connection, which came in at about the same length. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KILLING LESSONS by Saul Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Aficionados may fault Black for allowing the police at least one major oversight, but most readers will likely be too engrossed or happily grossed out to do anything but whip through the pages."
Ending the rampage of two sadistic serial killers may depend on a substance-abusing homicide detective facing an old lover and an unknown nemesis in this raw and utterly readable thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUMBOLDT'S GIFT by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 25, 1975

"Still if one is left with ''a kind of light-in-the-being'' that can overcome the terminal terror, it will represent underachiever Humboldt's great achievement."
As a critic once observed: "The language is the character and the action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1994

"Sheen and fascination come off of every page."
Bellow (Something to Remember Me By, 1991) makes it seem—in his introduction to these essays, addresses, interviews, and journalism pieces—as though he'd been reluctantly corralled into collecting them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THERE IS SIMPLY TOO MUCH TO THINK ABOUT by Saul Bellow
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 31, 2015

"This comprehensive collection illuminates Bellow's sense of his own identity and his changing world."
A nonfiction collection celebrates the centennial of Saul Bellow's (1915-2005) birth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO JERUSALEM AND BACK by Saul Bellow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 25, 1976

"The outing to Jerusalem and back earns him no peace of mind, and responsible readers have tough work ahead if they want to share the expedition's dry rewards."
Bellow goes to Israel in 1975—not to see the sights, but to talk, listen, and learn—and returns drenched in issues ("the facts are coming out of my ears") and keen on sharing his radar-oven exposure to the crossed wires (Israeli, Arab, Russian, American) that keep the Middle East just this side of all-out conflagration. Read full book review >