Search Results: "Richard W. Lacey"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1994

"British by birth but quite adaptable to American readers."
Charming, delightful, often richly depressing survey about what we eat, by Lacey (Medical Microbiology/Leeds;Unsafe for Human Consumption—not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOST TOWN by Richard W. Jennings
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 29, 2009

"Those unfamiliar with the author's style, however, may find themselves working a bit to acquire a taste for it. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Offbeat, quirky, peculiar, unusual—take your pick of adjectives; any (or all) could be used to describe the latest effort of a Midwestern writer known for original characters and unpredictable plots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 5, 2010

"A dog's tale with enough imagination to forgive its fleas."
This young adult book follows a precocious, rural dog named Button and her diverse group of animal friends as they journey from exploring nature to waging war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Bishop McIlvaine, Slavery, Britain & the Civil War by Richard W. Smith
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"An intriguing portrait of a religious figure's role in shaping public opinion."
A biography of a little-known cleric who defended Union interests in Britain during the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"This is a shame, for there is undoubtedly an interesting backstage story here—but one that needs a light, acerbic touch to bring it to life."
The story of the tortuous negotiations between the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the two Koreas over the staging of the 1988 summer Olympics in Seoul takes the reader into the heart of Cold War politics in all its paranoid splendor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FERRET ISLAND by Richard W. Jennings
ADVENTURE
Released: May 21, 2007

"Terrific, vintage stuff. (Fiction. 10-14)"
From an author who fairly defines "quirky" comes a downright loopy journey into territory both mythic and gleefully ridiculous. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY IN MT. MOLE by Richard W. Jennings
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 29, 2003

"A wry, witty, and always intelligent work that's as individualistic as its hero. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Nobody does quirky quite like Jennings, and this offering falls right into line with his other works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STINK CITY by Richard W. Jennings
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"A leisurely musing on matters olfactory and romantic, this offering features Jennings's trademark wit and offbeat characterization, lyricism alternating with humor to make its own unique literary perfume. (Fiction. 10-14)"
What do you get when the heir to the biggest—and smelliest—catfish-bait company in America decides that fish feel pain? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCRIBBLE by Richard W. Jennings
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"The narrative moves back and forth from the present to Lawson's days with the terminally ill Jip, his matter-of-fact narration by turns funny and achingly sad, the arbitrary nature of life and death—and life after death—mining the surreal for truth. (Fiction. 10-14)"
"That's the thing about missing somebody who's not coming back. . . . It's like trying to live without food." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1991

"Feminists will find Bailey's discussion of the masculine orientation of standard English particularly illuminating. (Twenty illustrations—not seen.)"
Drawing on his vast erudition about the uses of language, Bailey (English Language and Literature/Univ. of Michigan), associate editor of the Oxford Companion to the English Language, describes the history of the cultural, social, political, and even psychological attitudes toward the English language. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 5, 2012

"Swift, informative and not too scholarly for general readers."
A former associate editor of the Oxford Companion to the English Language identifies eight major centers of influence on American English and describes how each has helped shape the tongue of today. Read full book review >