Search Results: "Rigoberto González"


BOOK REVIEW

BUTTERFLY BOY by Rigoberto González
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Too bad the author failed to include an epilogue about his present-day successes (he's a Guggenheim Fellowship recipient and an associate professor of English at the Univ. of Illinois)—it could have transformed this cheerless tale into something inspirational."
Poignant, heartfelt memoir of a gay Latino immigrant's coming-of-age, played out against a relentless backdrop of abuse and neglect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MY HUNGERS  by Rigoberto González
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2013

"The literary sensibility speaks more broadly to the human condition, as the author relates the particularities of his own experience through shards of memory."
Sweet and sad but generally tender vignettes about a poet/professor's coming-of-age as a gay Mexican immigrant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOLEDAD SIGH-SIGHS/SOLEDAD SUSPIROS by Rigoberto González
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2003

"These strengths, combined with González's insights into the child's mind, create a visually inviting and emotionally encouraging experience, but one that will likely function better as a shared reading between adult and child rather than a child's read-alone. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Soledad (whose name means solitude) sighs because she is a latchkey kid. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2005

"Possibly a first of its kind and a worthy leader. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Antonio has discovered the problem of words: As much as he loves spelling new words and reading with his mother and her life-partner Leslie, some of the children in his school use words cruelly when Leslie comes to meet him after school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SO-CALLED VACATION by Genaro González
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 31, 2009

"Some food for thought, but Joyce McDonald's Devil on My Heels (2004) or Cynthia DeFelice's Under the Same Sky (2003) presents many of the same issues better. (Fiction. YA)"
González focuses on family relationships in this sketchy tale of a Tejano and his two sons in a migrant labor camp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Urban activists in other cities have much to learn from New York's experience, and González's book makes a good place to start."
A leading Latino journalist looks at the left-populist uprising that brought Bill de Blasio into the New York mayor's office and sharpened the nation's blue-red divide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 12, 1989

From González-Wippler, an anthropologist and initiate in Santeria: a vivid exploration of that mysterious and misunderstand religion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 28, 1998

In what he describes as "discontinuous, impressionistic renderings of some scenes from a man's life," the author brings himself into focus through writing about others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE BEGINNING WAS THE SEA by Tomás González
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"In a cautionary tale with a familiar moral, the arresting prose and complex characters shine."
A couple purchases a dilapidated estate and moves to a remote region of Colombia in this short novel, originally published in 1983 and González's first to be translated into English. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"Wonderfully cinematic and surreal for readers willing to go with Alvin's flow. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)"
Alvin rides his old mower to visit his brother, taking a slow journey across a beautiful landscape and enjoying the ride. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OXFORD BOOK OF LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORIES by Roberto González Echevarría
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"An essential and wonder-full book."
This remarkably comprehensive anthology showcases the work of 52 writers, ranging from the 16th-century ``Colonial Period'' to such comparatively little known contemporary storytellers as Cuban Antonio Ben°tez Rojo and Venezuela's JosÇ Balza. Read full book review >