Search Results: "Rob Sanders"


BOOK REVIEW

BUFFALO CLOUDS by Craig Sanders
Released: Jan. 26, 2015

"A charming coming-of-age story full of humor, mystery, and romance set in the Old West."
In Sanders' debut YA novel, a 17-year-old boy unravels the truth behind the mysterious circumstances of his father's death, discovering love and courage on the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 2011

"An uneven effort that, despite its shortcomings, will motivate some readers."
Business consultant, Today Show regular and former Yahoo! exec Sanders (The Likeability Factor, 2009, etc.) offers advice for building confidence through the prism of his grandmother's teachings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECOND DEADLY SIN by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Sept. 2, 1977

"The end-product is unquestionably lively and as readably mindless as a padded Erie Stanley Gardner can be, but, if there are going to be five more of these time-wasters, one for every sin, a little more imagination and a lot less formula would be advisable."
Far less kinky and more straightforwardly police-procedural than the bestselling First, Chief Ed ("Iron Balls") Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"An exceptional story of compelling interest in a time of school shootings, ethnic and class strife, and other unbound expressions of madness and illness."
Disturbing, sometimes-horrifying story of true crime and justice only partially served. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE SONGS by Lawrence Sanders
Released: May 30, 1972

"When Mr. Sanders decides there's more to life than nakedly meets the eye (or bravely assaults the ear — Use 'shit' instead of 'love' and the song sounds the same) perhaps he'll get back to a more interesting form of entertainment such as The Anderson Tapes."
You might almost prefer the randy Pleasures of Helen to the lyricized sensuality here (namely Maine) where Pieter Vanderhorst, a priapic forebear also called the Patroon, rules the household in a very virile fashion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADES OF GRAY by Kim Sanders
Released: Oct. 4, 2011

"The romance enthusiast won't be disappointed with this novel that never skimps on passion or story."
In Sanders' debut novel, renowned photographer Samantha Jennings loves her camera and solitude, but when she's accused of murdering her lover, only the man who broke her heart 10 years earlier can save her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PRIVATE DEATH OF PUBLIC DISCOURSE by Barry Sanders
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 26, 1998

"But there may be an insurmountable problem here, for only those who already read books will read this one."
A sprawling, provocative conversation with loose ends that are the forgivable product of a literate mind grappling with big issues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TROLL WHO CRIED WOLF by Rob Harrell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"A most admirable troll, notwithstanding the big floppy ears and flyaway orange hair. (Graphic/fantasy hybrid. 10-12)"
Beleaguered middle school troll Zarf gets a chance to show his true mettle when the Big Bad Wolf's motorcycle-riding minions take the Littlepig family hostage in this sequel to The Trouble with Weasels (2014). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUSSELL THE SHEEP by Rob Scotton
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2005

"Quite a contrast to the usual run of ovine-driven snoozers, like Phyllis Root's Ten Sleepy Sheep, illustrated by Susan Gaber (2004). (Picture book. 6-8)"
Scotton makes a stylish debut with this tale of a sleepless sheep—depicted as a blocky, pop-eyed, very soft-looking woolly with a skinny striped nightcap of unusual length—trying everything, from stripping down to his spotted shorts to counting all six hundred million billion and ten stars, twice, in an effort to doze off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PASSION OF MOLLY T. by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Sept. 17, 1984

"But, though limply idiotic as suspense and uncommonly vile as an attempt at misogynistic titillation, this is sure to sell fairly well—like Peter S.—thanks to the Sanders byline and the below-the-belt, lowest-common-denominator approach."
Sanders, never the most tasteful of potboiler-makers, continues his descent into sheer dumb vulgarity—following The Seduction of Peter S. with a neanderthal political/sexual thriller about the feminist threat of the future. Read full book review >