Search Results: "Robert Andrew Parker"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"Fusing Parker's artistic talent and passion for jazz (he's a musician, too), this sensitively embellished biography is totally on time. (author's and biographical notes, bibliography of adult sources) (Picture book/biography. 5-10)"
Renowned illustrator Parker supplies both an affecting text and luminescent watercolors in homage to the virtuosic Tatum. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"Screenwriter Knott effortlessly handles the nonstop plot complications, doesn't bother to create actual characters and comes a cropper with the laconic dialogue he supplies for Virgil and Everett, who sound like parodies of the strong, silent types Parker created."
Not even their creator's death can slow down newly appointed Indian Territory marshal Virgil Cole and his friend and deputy Everett Hitch (Blue-Eyed Devil, 2010, etc.) as they board a train for a routine journey that turns out to be anything but. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2005

"Enhanced by a map and by Parker's offhand, full-page portraits at the chapter heads, it all makes a grand, poignant tale. (bibliography) (Biography. 10-12)"
Any account of this Scottish navigator's adventurous career would make absorbing reading; Kraske adds unusual dimension by enlarging on the historical record with credible insights into his character as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORVILLE by Haven Kimmel
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 22, 2003

"Parker's sophisticated watercolors add some interest to the effort, but this misguided attempt is too long and too esoteric for the intended audience, another illustrated short story with adult sensibilities. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Orville is a huge, unattractive stray dog who is taken in by an older couple on a farm in this overly long, depressing tale, a first children's story from memoirist Kimmel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YEAR OF NO MORE CORN by Helen Ketteman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A lively, likable tall tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Beanie complains that ``Dad says I'm too young to help'' plant corn, Grampa allows that ``that's funny, because he said I'm too old''—and wisely seizes the opportunity to describe the spring of 1928, when his successive plantings were destroyed by a string of disasters rivaling the plagues of Egypt: floods, wind, crows, a sun so hot the hens laid hard-boiled eggs and the corn popped. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACROSS THE BLUE PACIFIC by Louise Borden
ADVENTURE
Released: April 24, 2006

"Other than the importance of keeping and passing on family stories, there's no overt message in this understated account—which makes it more likely to leave readers moved and thoughtful. (afterword) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Embroidered details and the passage of time don't make this episode from the author's family history any less topical. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BALLET OF THE ELEPHANTS by Leda Schubert
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 2006

"A charming tale to share with young fans of the circus and ballet. (bibliography, web sites, extensive author note) (Picture book. 4-7)"
In Florida, 1942, a most unusual collaboration took place. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STOWAWAY by Karen Hesse
ADVENTURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"In a lucid, readable style, free of excessive nautical jargon, Hesse simultaneously takes readers along on one of history's greatest enterprises, and introduces them to one of history's most prodigious natural leaders. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Presented in diary format, this is the story of 11-year-old Nicholas Young's 1768 voyage as a stowaway on Captain Cook's ship Endeavor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLD FEET by Cynthia DeFelice
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"There the tale ends, but be warned: shivering delightedly, entranced readers or listeners will positively demand to know what happens next, so have some version of 'Tailypo' ready as a follow-up. (Picture book/folktale. 7-9)"
Another hilariously macabre folktale from the creators of Dancing Skeleton (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HATMAKER'S SIGN by Candace Fleming
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1998

"Adding considerably to the charm of the book are Parker's ink-and-watercolor illustrations, with a sketched, fleeting quality that seems to summon the events from history and renders them with immediacy. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Thomas Jefferson was feeling stung. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FULL WORM MOON by Margo Lemieux
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"Parker's atmospheric watercolors capture the play of firelight and shadow within a smoky wigwam, the progression from sunset to dusk to dark, and the sharp shadows and phosphorescent outlines of objects seen in brilliant moonlight, like wraiths of mist rising through frosty air. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Before the arrival of Europeans, an Algonquian family keeps a chilly vigil on a March night, hoping to see the first earthworms emerge from the thawing earth and dance in the moonlight (as legend has it) to the music of unseen drums. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOMAN WHO FELL FROM THE SKY by John Bierhorst
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 16, 1993

"Most satisfying to look at, to read aloud, or to hear. (Folklore/Picture book. 5+)"
From a distinguished editor and translator of Native American lore (most recently, Lightning Inside You, 1992), a simple but dramatically retold creation myth. Read full book review >