Search Results: "Robert Atwan"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS 1994 by Tracy Kidder
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 3, 1994

"A solid addition to an annual series that has won many plaudits."
Volume nine strains a bit to achieve its predecessors' diversity by stretching the definition of ``essay.'' Take, for example, the two longest contributions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS 1991 by Joyce Carol Oates
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 29, 1991

"Overall, though, not the essay's finest outing."
Oates, in her introduction, defines the essay, a la Randall Jarrell, as "prose works of certain lengths that have many more things right about them than wrong" Montaigne, Hazlitt, Mandelstam would roll in their graves! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Balanced, inventive and often dazzling, this collection shows off American writing at its deepest and best: feeling, thinking, in love with its own possibilities."
Twenty consistently fine, persistently challenging essays in the third volume of this annual collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER BIN LADEN by Abdel Bari Atwan
NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 2013

"A sobering, intensive report."
An al-Qaida watcher lends some farsighted insight into the group's motivation and direction. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROBERT OLMSTEAD
by J.W. Bonner

At a time when our country’s past serves a daily story in the news, Robert Olmstead’s latest novel, Savage Country, takes readers back to the 19th-century frontier as well as returning readers to a more traditional type of yarn spinning: equal parts adventure tale, Biblical narrative, and Greek tragedy.

Savage Country depicts a world where justice is often ...


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BLOG POST

THE BEST SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, & HORROR READS IN MAY
by John DeNardo

Looking for something to read in May? Here's an irresistible selection of science fiction, fantasy, and horror books that will satisfy your readerly desires. They include stories about an alternate WWII, steampunk airships, the zombie apocalypse, assassins hellbent on revenge, a space-based suicide mission, souls available for rent, and more.

 

The Berlin Project by Gregory Benford

One of ...


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BOOK REVIEW

LINUS THE VEGETARIAN T. REX by Robert Neubecker
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"Though they may have fun with it, readers' attempts to sink their teeth into this story will find them gummed up with uncertain conclusions. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This dino with a penchant for greenery means well, but his tale is clearly hampered by its confusing message. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAHOOLA'S SONG by Robert Anke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 15, 2012

"A worthy-enough lesson in a passable package. An additional title at best. (Picture book. 4-7)"
All that glitters can turn a raccoon's head, but how much is enough? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTER IN WHITE by Robert Sabuda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 6, 2007

"The twirling skater is particularly impressive, but from the opening whirl of snowflakes to the closing view of a pair of doves tying the bow on a gift, this brims with seasonal joie de vivre. (Novelty. 6-8)"
As a visual bonbon for holiday giving or display, Sabuda offers a small, Christmas-themed stocking stuffer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN YOU DIG IT? by Robert Weinstock
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 2, 2010

"A prehistoric romp for the ages. (Picture book/poetry. 4-8)"
Not so much an archeology lesson (though Great-Aunt LuAnn Abrue does enjoy finding "fossil poo") but rather poetic musings on how dinosaurs and cavemen really lived. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOD HATES YOU, TOO, AND OTHER POEMS by Robert Weinstock
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 2009

"Definitely, as the closing poem puts it, 'Food For Thought.' (Picture book/poetry. 7-11)"
Addressing picky eaters of all ages and continuing to empower food the way he did in his Giant Meatball (2008), Weinstock offers a set of verses that are often as stomach-churning as they are hilarious: "If everyone hates different food, / Then couldn't it be true / That creamed chipped beef dislikes Gertrude / And liver gags on Lou?" Read full book review >