Search Results: "Robert Bell"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 3, 1992

"Mostly a dry barrage of facts and figures, but bound to create a stir."
A compendium of scientific scandal from Bell (Economics/CUNY; You Can Win at Office Politics, 1984, etc.), who, in case after exhaustively detailed case of scientific research, exposes lying, cheating, and stealing. Read full book review >

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ROBERT OLMSTEAD
by J.W. Bonner

At a time when our country’s past serves a daily story in the news, Robert Olmstead’s latest novel, Savage Country, takes readers back to the 19th-century frontier as well as returning readers to a more traditional type of yarn spinning: equal parts adventure tale, Biblical narrative, and Greek tragedy.

Savage Country depicts a world where justice is often ...


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BEST BOOKS OF 2016: PATRICIA BELL-SCOTT
by Maya Payne Smart

In The Firebrand and the First Lady, scholar Patricia Bell-Scott illuminates the unlikely friendship between two historic American women. Radical civil and women’s rights activist Pauli Murray and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt corresponded for years and swayed one another’s social justice aims and strategies. Their views never converged, but Bell-Scott makes a compelling case that they grew with and toward ...


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THE BEST SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, & HORROR READS IN MAY
by John DeNardo

Looking for something to read in May? Here's an irresistible selection of science fiction, fantasy, and horror books that will satisfy your readerly desires. They include stories about an alternate WWII, steampunk airships, the zombie apocalypse, assassins hellbent on revenge, a space-based suicide mission, souls available for rent, and more.

 

The Berlin Project by Gregory Benford

One of ...


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BOOK REVIEW

RABBIT & ROBOT AND RIBBIT by Cece Bell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Engrossing! (Early reader. 7-9)"
Three's a crowd in Bell's follow-up to Rabbit & Robot: The Sleepover (2012) when Rabbit gets jealous of Robot's new amphibian pal, Ribbit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERYTHING IS FLAMMABLE by Gabrielle Bell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 18, 2017

"A provocative, moving, and darkly funny book that seems almost worth the crises that it chronicles."
The latest from one of the finest contemporary graphic artists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EL DEAFO by Cece Bell
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Worthy of a superhero. (Graphic memoir. 8 & up)"
A humorous and touching graphic memoir about finding friendship and growing up deaf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOCK MONKEY RIDES AGAIN by Cece Bell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"Happy trails to them, and to all readers with the stomach for such relentless, intense cuteness. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The all-knit toy actor is back in the saddle again, riding a tide of bit parts to a starring role as a singing cowboy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ITTY BITTY by Cece Bell
by Cece Bell, illustrated by Cece Bell
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2009

"Children will do the same with this terse, appropriately diminutive but definitive assurance that size really doesn't matter. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Itty Bitty may be the most aptly named pooch ever, but here he moves with inspiring confidence through normal-sized city and country alike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VOYEURS by Gabrielle Bell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"Playfully drawn and provocatively written, the memoir reinforces Bell's standing among the first rank of the genre's artists."
"Graphic memoir" only hints at the artistry of a complex, literary-minded author who resists the bare-all confessionalism so common to the genre and blurs the distinction between fiction and factual introspection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHESS MACHINE by Robert Löhr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 9, 2007

"In the author's notes that end the novel, Löhr explains what is based on historical record and what he has invented, but this is a work of such marvelously creative imagination that it makes little difference what's factual and what isn't—it all rings true."
Rich in detail and psychological depth, this historical novel of 18th-century Europe has plenty of contemporary resonance for American readers. Read full book review >