Search Results: "Robert Ben Garant"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 5, 2011

"The only compass readers will ever need to navigate the treacherous waters of filmmaking."
A hilarious and helpful insider's guide to launching a successful writing career in Hollywood. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROBERT OLMSTEAD
by J.W. Bonner

At a time when our country’s past serves a daily story in the news, Robert Olmstead’s latest novel, Savage Country, takes readers back to the 19th-century frontier as well as returning readers to a more traditional type of yarn spinning: equal parts adventure tale, Biblical narrative, and Greek tragedy.

Savage Country depicts a world where justice is often ...


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BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ROBOT by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Girl power at its best. A sure winner! (Graphic novel. 3-12)"
Possibilities abound for a small, brown-skinned girl with time, a tool belt, and a penchant for urban adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORDS by Ben Boos
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Armchair warriors, junior members of the Society for Creative Anachronism and budding graphic artists will be riveted. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 9-16)"
An unabashed browsing item, this big, square album is chock-full of digitally painted images of knives and swords, laid out in generic arrays with every nick, notch, decorative motif and gleaming highlight rendered in lovingly realistic detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIGHTY JACK by Ben Hatke
Kirkus Star
by Ben Hatke, illustrated by Ben Hatke
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Very mighty indeed. (Graphic fantasy. 7-13)"
A comic-book riff on the classic tale of "Jack and the Beanstalk," in which an impoverished young boy learns that his new garden has a mind of its own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FISHING BROTHERS GRUFF by Ben Galbraith
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Illustrated with a garish tangle of photo-manipulated found objects, scowling painted figures and harvested fish—plus the occasional die-cut hole—this import will be best directed toward readers who need their lessons bludgeoned home. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Taking the familiar folk tale as his model but revising the ending considerably, Galbraith fashions a blunt cautionary tale aimed at heedless degraders of the environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT CAME IN THE MAIL by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 21, 2016

"Surprisingly, no snails included. Still, more fun than bills and junk mail. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sending mail to…a mailbox? Clever! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOO! by Ben Newman
by Ben Newman, illustrated by Ben Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2017

"A natural as a high-volume storytime ice breaker or lagniappe. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Everyone's afraid of something. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUG! by Ben Mantle
by Ben Mantle, illustrated by Ben Mantle
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"While the covers of both titles suggest lots of interaction, the pages within fail to deliver the goods. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
An ode to various kinds of hugs as enacted by various animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TABLE SETS ITSELF by Ben Clanton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Clanton makes chores a delight! (Picture book. 4-8)"
A young girl receives a new responsibility, but when the prized task becomes a boring duty, she and her tableware friends must find a way to keep things fresh and funny in this winning tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 4, 2012

"Imaginative and utterly bewitching. (Graphic science fiction. 9-12)"
Lovable Zita returns in a charmingly dashing interplanetary adventure to save yet another doomed planet from impending peril. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREAT-UNCLE ALFRED FORGETS by Ben Shecter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"They fairly radiate with the affection between these two characters as they struggle to communicate. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fragmentary conversation between Emily and Great-Uncle Alfred, who is increasingly forgetful; his questions and statements are sometimes funny, sometimes lyrical, sometimes philosophical, and sometimes saggy—the dialogue is a little too realistic in its stops and starts. Read full book review >