Search Results: "Robert D. Kaplan"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 19, 2010

"A useful, teeming point of departure for exploring these up-and-coming Eurasian dynamos."
An ambitious, somewhat amorphous look at the many "transition zone[s]" comprising traditional trading posts along the Indian Ocean that are now emerging as important strategic flashpoints. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARNING THE ROCKIES by Robert D. Kaplan
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A text both evocative and provocative for readers who like to think."
As our geography has long insulated us from foreign invasion, so has it shaped our temperament and enabled us to become a world power, a category we must modify but continue to inhabit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"A memorable portrait of an increasingly important region. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Timely and vivid view of the Balkans, by Kaplan (Soldiers of God, 1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1996

"But for sheer entertainment, vigor, sharp observation, and thoughtful comparison, Kaplan takes a lot of beating."
A ``brief romp'' through West Africa, Egypt, Iran, Central Asia, western China, Pakistan, India, Vietnam, and Cambodia by Atlantic Monthly contributing editor Kaplan (Balkan Ghosts, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"A solid work of acuity and breadth."
Kaplan (Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power, 2010, etc.) sagely plots global territorial transformations from the United States to China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 1993

"Full of fascinating, sometimes brilliant, insight into the politics of the area and its impact on those entrusted with US policy."
An analysis of the evolution of US policy toward the Middle East—as well as of the foreign-policy elite that guided it—that goes far deeper than the headlines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 11, 2007

"A relentlessly admiring portrait of our armed services, but without the traditional overlay of patriotic homilies."
Absorbing continuation of Imperial Grunts (2005), with journalist Kaplan visiting American military forces in another dozen nations as they work to spread the influence of the world's leading imperial power—a phrase that he insists describes us just as it once did Britain and Rome. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"A clarity of vision remains, however, that demands our attention. (Author tour)"
Journey to America's west in search of a nation that may no longer exist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 2004

"Interestingly written throughout and brought into the present with a memorable visit to the arch-traveler Patrick Leigh Fermor: a standout travel book, and a literate companion to places less remote than Kaplan now haunts."
A departure for a geopolitical gloom-and-doom Atlantic Monthly reporter: a book of travels to places where he's not being shot at and whose inhabitants are not busily butchering one another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASIA'S CAULDRON by Robert D. Kaplan
NON-FICTION
Released: March 25, 2014

"An up-and-down examination in which the author claims that the future of the Pacific Rim will be decided not by what China does but by what America does."
A foreign policy expert looks at the major players in the Southeast Asia Pacific Rim and their nervous watching of what China will do. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 2000

"As with all of Kaplan's work, solid journalism combines with a gloomy sense of history to produce a worthy study."
More travels to difficult places in search of future geopolitical nightmares. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 11, 1999

"Full of ideas but going nowhere in particular, which is perhaps what the author intended all along. (First printing of 40,000; author tour)"
Part history, part philosophy, with some story problems thrown in for good measure: a wandering tale of the origins and uses of the number zero. Read full book review >