Search Results: "Robert F. Dalzell, Jr."


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"A timely reminder that money is neither good nor evil, but its uses reveal a lot about a person's choices and values."
What America's wealthiest have done, and are doing, with their money. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"This is the definitive study of Mount Vernon, long overdue for the place that's been a seeding ground for ideals of American independence. (86 b&w photos and illustrations, not seen)"
Washington as seen from the vantage point of his beloved creation, Mount Vernon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 25, 2007

"Illustrations include accurately detailed color sketches, a map and a pair of portrait photos. (brief reading list) (Biography. 10-13)"
Following in the footsteps of his illustrious uncle (or his uncle's ghostwriter, perhaps), Kennedy profiles a historical figure who, in his view, exemplified the brand of courage and intellect required to keep this country the Land of the Free. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUCKER'S LAST STAND by William F. Buckley Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 12, 1990

"Sensible spying, with buffoonish Lyndon Johnson for comic relief."
Following a clear, hard-edged recovery in Mongoose, R.I.P. (1987), Buckley keeps up the pace in his literate Blackford Oakes spy series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1970

"Buckley's selections and section prefaces reflect his individual dream talking, an asset insofar as this frames the parts into a cohesive (though pluralistic) personal vision, but a liability in a collection for a series intended to be standard and authoritative."
To remedy a glaring neglect in their American Heritage Series, general editors Leonard Levy and Alfred Young gave the inimitable Buckley a loose rein to gather together his version of the best of twentieth century American conservative thought. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"It's a bravura performance, albeit one indelibly marked by Buckley's perpetually righteous, and right-wing, stance."
It's interesting to note, in these days of political realignment, that—per the subtitle—Buckley now seems to be calling himself a ``libertarian'' rather than a ``conservative''- -though you wouldn't know it from the almost invariably middle-of- the-road to left-leaning targets he spits darts at in this generous collection of National Review columns (1985-93), speeches, and essays from Playboy, The New York Times, and elsewhere. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 23, 1961

"Buckley's admirers buy books."
A major conservative statement defending the existence and the work of the House Committee on Un-American Activities by William F. Buckley, Jr. and the editors of the National Review. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"A common-sense volume on personal finance, written for men who take responsibility for their families' fiscal well-being."
An enthusiastic guide to financial planning focuses on the highly masculine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 26, 1990

"While one may argue with the specifics of Buckley's proposal, one cannot deny that he has written a provocative apologia for a timely idea."
Long the dean of American conservative thought, Buckley here surprisingly—and eloquently—espouses a new government program: voluntary, nonmilitary National Service. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 12, 1963

"Major advertising is planned and (no matter what anyone has to say about it) the book will sell — it's an author stimulated audience via TV and his magazine."
William F. Buckley, Jr., who dissipated his power to shock in his first book, God And Man At Yale, here discusses such figures as Norman Mailer and Adam Clayton Powell; such matters as progressive eduction; and such problems as integration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"In all, an assortment to entertain even some language lovers who find Buckley's politics less than amusing."
A whimsical miscellany that is essentially what Vaughan (Buckley's editor at Doubleday), in his introduction, calls it, a "book on language," although it does not hold itself opprobrious, reprehensible, or peccant for wandering off topic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVING THE QUEEN by William F. Buckley Jr.
Released: Jan. 9, 1975

"Don't go Hunting around for other affiliations (speculate if you will why Blacky's girl Sally is sexily 'prehensile') and take it as is—suede-gloved intrigue."
Mr. Buckley's first novel takes place under not so deep CIA cover in the '50's and it is an unassailable entertainment which tells an original story with suave good humor. Read full book review >