Search Results: "Robert Graves"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 25, 1969

"Still, this is largely a fault of style or tone: beneath the magisterial bitchiness lies a very real attachment to art and craft."
Some time ago in The New York Review, Robert Mazzocco wrote that "if it is true Graves won't suffer fools gladly, it is even truer he suffers his betters not at all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PROCEED, SERGEANT LAMB by Robert Graves
Released: Oct. 15, 1941

"Heavy going at times, but worth while."
Sequel and conclusion to Sergeant Lamb's America, a book which was lost in the fanfare of that other story of the Tory side of the American Revolution, Oliver Wiswell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"While Mr. Graves is personal in his views and sometimes arguable in his opinions, the eclectic reader will be interested and stimulated."
Robert Graves recently followed Auden into the Poetry Chair at Oxford, and now we on our side of the Atlantic can be grateful too- for his University lectures, collected here, are delightful reading with a classic felicity. Mr. Graves' prose, though far more involuted than his verse, in elegant and engaging. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 17, 1964

"Early hammock reading."
Everyone must have an eagle, said Gide, meaning everyone must attempt the best. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1960

"Beautifully printed and bound, informative and accurate, but not at all difficult to read, this is an outstanding reference for students of sociology, anthropology, ancient art, and literature, as well as those interested in mythology."
Richard Aldington and Delano Ames have translated and adapted the original French Encyclopedia with the assistance of experts in each field of mythology—Prehistoric, Egyptian, Assyro-Babylonian, Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Teutonic, Slavonic, Finno-Ugric, Ancient Persian, Indian, Chinese, North and South American, Oceanian, and African. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERGEANT LAMB'S AMERICA by Robert Graves
Released: June 15, 1940

"Really straight history, but so told that Lamb's adventures moves along with an authentic feel."
Another of Graves' impressive recreations of history, this time as a representative British soldier sees the War of Independence, Lamb, wild Irishman, involved in a cockfight and drinking bout, finds himself enrolled in the army in '73, and soon thereafter is shipped to Canada. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 23, 1957

"But the whole adds up to an unusual reading experience."
Graves has an established reputation as an historical novelist and all his special gifts come into play in an unusually fascinating recreation of the career, trial and education of Palmer, who was known as the mass poisoner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I, CLAUDIUS by Robert Graves
Released: June 1, 1934

"A book that should rate leading reviews, and that those who like historical fiction and biography will find worth reading."
Fictionized biography of a Roman emperor, who lived at a strategic period in the history of the empire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW COLLECTED POEMS by Robert Graves
Released: Nov. 5, 1976

"But this does supply a fine; brief biographical introduction by lames McKinley."
Robert Graves turned 81-years-old this year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCCUPATION, WRITER by Robert Graves
Released: Feb. 23, 1950

"For contemplation — and controversy."
A collection of essays and two plays that affords a lively array of topics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 18, 1965

"An admirable gathering."
We expect anything and everything from Robert Graves, but even so it's a little difficult to think of him addressing the London School of Economics or our own Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POEMS, 1970-1972 by Robert Graves
Released: Jan. 5, 1972

"There are some poems more general and less problematical grouped loosely at the end, but nothing comparable in force or ecstatic music."
Graves has grown old, but for him it seems to be a process of intensification and, possibly too, the achievement of an unassailable position. Read full book review >