Search Results: "Robert J. Allison"


BOOK REVIEW

ALLISON by Allen Say
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"He addresses the dark side of an adoptive child's feelings carefully, and while the resolution is a bit convenient (and may require interpretation for younger children), it still carries truth. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Say's trademark nuanced and limpid watercolors convey and complete the emotional resonance of this adoption story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 26, 2005

"Excellently researched and argued; a useful adjunct to Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin's broader-ranging American Prometheus."
Did a vast right-wing conspiracy bring down the peace wing of the American nuclear establishment? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 2, 2011

"A useful introduction to a complicated series of historical events."
"The history of our Revolution will be one continued lie from one end to the other," prophesied John Adams. Allison (History/Suffolk Univ.; Revolutionary Sites of Greater Boston, 2005, etc.) aims to correct a few of those mistruths. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

J by Howard Jacobson
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A pleasure, as reading Jacobson always is—though much different from what we've come to expect, which is not at all a bad thing."
Jacobson (The Finkler Question, 2010, etc.), Britain's answer to Philip Roth, returns with an enigmatic tale of the near future.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING FOXES by Allison Blyler
ANIMALS
Released: May 2, 1991

"Blake's debut, Riptide (1990), was notable for its skill and sensitivity; this partnership with Blyler's unusually thoughtful and imaginative verse is even more outstanding. (Picture book. 4+)"
In muted turquoise and gold, rich shades of lavender and sharp fox red, a series of hauntingly lovely double-spread paintings extend the images in Blyler's cycle of poetic epiphanies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALLISON HEWITT IS TRAPPED by Madeleine Roux
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"A treat for lovers of groaners and roamers with neither enough gore nor pathos to keep casual readers engaged."
A fierce young bookseller blogs the zombie apocalypse in this debut novel from Wisconsin resident Roux. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEMIMA J by Jane Green
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 14, 2000

"Slightly unpredictable story development saves this from exactly duplicating the vast mound of similar feel-good modern fairy tales for women, but it lives in the same neighborhood."
An overweight woman turns from ugly duckling to swan in British novelist Green's American debut: a tale that offers plenty of engaging plot twists but not much substance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

J. EDEN by Kit Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 1996

"Terrific takes on time's rush, with a touch of that personal enlightenment offered to a certain generation of moviegoers by The Big Chill—but less glib."
Reedian thoughts about life, marriage, middle age, and children when three couples, their kids, and a close friend spend the summer lumped together in a New England farmhouse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DR. J by Karl Taro Greenfeld
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"A good enough treatment of the phenomenon called 'Dr. J' and an especially thoughtful account of the man, Julius Erving."
The NBA's most transformative player submits an unusually revealing autobiography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

J. P. by John Mooers
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 31, 2013

"A history buff's guilty pleasure, offering a behind-the-scenes peek into the world of a man whose impact on society lasts to this day."
A historical novel that paints an intimate portrait of J.P. Morgan, U.S. banker, financier and philanthropist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GENERATION J by Lisa Schiffman
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Schiffman's challenge will be to sustain her winsome, ironical tone as (and if) she enters more deeply into Jewish community. (Author tour)"
With a blessedly light touch, Schiffman, formerly an editor with the San Francisco Review of Books and until recently a nonobservant Jew, relates her beginner's quest for a Judaism she can genuinely practice and believe. Read full book review >