Search Results: "Robert Jay Lifton"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1993

"An almost convincing account of how to make virtue out of a necessity."
Noted psychiatrist and author Lifton (Psychiatry and Psychology/John Jay College) contends that the self is less traumatized by modern rootlessness than we might expect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Convincing and impassioned without being maudlin."
Though they tread familiar ground while observing the impact of state-sanctioned violence on society, the co-authors of Hiroshima in America (1995) have nonetheless written a compelling censure of capital punishment in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1999

"Nonetheless, this is a powerful book, suggesting how fragile both the human psyche and human decency may be."
A study of the historical and psychological origins and meanings of the Japanese cult Aum Shinriky?, by the noted psychiatrist and author Lifton. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLIMATE SWERVE by Robert Jay Lifton
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"A powerful and well-reasoned call to action."
A clear argument that "confronting the full danger of nuclear and climate devastation enables us to sustain rather than destroy our species." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WITNESS TO AN EXTREME CENTURY by Robert Jay Lifton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2011

"A call for a moral awakening by a deeply compassionate chronicler of our times."
A memoir by a courageous psychiatrist and National Book Award winner whose life's work has been the study of why fundamentally decent individuals commit evil acts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 18, 1995

"Eloquent, somber, and immensely thought-provoking. (Book-of- the-Month Club/History Book Club featured alternates)"
Noted authors Lifton (Protean Self, 1993, etc.) and Mitchell (The Campaign of the Century, 1992) ``explore what happened to America as a consequence of Hiroshimaboth the bomb's existence in the world, and our having used it.'' In a painstaking and painful psycho-historical analysis, the authors are concerned with examining the motivations of those who made the decisions, particularly Truman, and the effects of that decision on Truman and on the development of subsequent US policy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 1993

"Brain candy, then, and none too convincing."
A brief for a new discipline known as ``evolutionary psychology''—as well as a pessimistic assessment of the human condition, based on the alleged biological sources of social customs in lemurs and other primates. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE POND GOD by Samuel Jay Keyser
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"These flaws undermine Keyser's occasional insights and lyricism, and make this a disappointing collection. (Folktales. 9-12)"
Original fables in free verse are only varyingly successful, making for a collection that fizzles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 27, 1994

"Ultimately, though, the book is imbalanced and unconvincing, despite its passion."
An useful though biased and histrionic account of the adopted person's struggle to form ``an authentic sense of self.'' Lifton (Lost and Found, 1979; Twice Born, 1975) continues to explore the struggles and journeys of adopted people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBERT FROST by Robert Frost
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 17, 2017

"Children will devour these suggestive illustrations as instructors help them unpack the many lessons to be gleaned from Frost's conversational yet complex verse. (glossed terms in margins, notes, index) (Picture book/poetry. 10-14)"
A movingly illustrated selection of Frost's verse. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROBERT OLMSTEAD
by J.W. Bonner

At a time when our country’s past serves a daily story in the news, Robert Olmstead’s latest novel, Savage Country, takes readers back to the 19th-century frontier as well as returning readers to a more traditional type of yarn spinning: equal parts adventure tale, Biblical narrative, and Greek tragedy.

Savage Country depicts a world where justice is often ...


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