Search Results: "Robert Kuttner"


BOOK REVIEW

DEBTORS' PRISON by Robert Kuttner
NON-FICTION
Released: May 2, 2013

"Illuminating economic history and sometimes eye-opening about the current situation—however, this version of leftist economics will likely be taken as an ideological counterpoint to rightist free market doctrines, rather than a political solution capable of bringing representatives of different interests together in common purpose."
American Prospect co-founder and -editor Kuttner (A Presidency In Peril: The Inside Story of Obama's Promise, Wall Street's Power and the Struggle to Control Our Economic Future, 2010, etc.) critiques the Obama administration's embrace of debt-driven austerity policies and calls for the resumption of postponed financial reforms. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 22, 1990

Kuttner's brief here is not against capitalism but, rather, against its "utopian variation"—the laissez-faire idealism of Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 2007

"Kuttner argues for a saner, more managed system of American capitalism—that he does so in a manner that is not only refreshing but reassuring is a testament to both his broad understanding of history and his impressive grasp on the inner workings of modern American capitalism."
American Prospect founder and co-editor Kuttner (Everything for Sale: The Virtues and Limits of Markets, 1997, etc.) issues a scathing broadside aimed at the failures of laissez-faire American capitalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Leone, president of the Twentieth Century Fund (which sponsored Kuttner's book). (Author tour)"
An exhaustive but tendentious critique of market economics from the liberal commentator who first addressed this issue in The End of Laissez-Faire (1991). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

THE BEST SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY, & HORROR READS IN MAY
by John DeNardo

Looking for something to read in May? Here's an irresistible selection of science fiction, fantasy, and horror books that will satisfy your readerly desires. They include stories about an alternate WWII, steampunk airships, the zombie apocalypse, assassins hellbent on revenge, a space-based suicide mission, souls available for rent, and more.

 

The Berlin Project by Gregory Benford

One of ...


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BOOK REVIEW

ROBERT CROWTHER'S POP-UP DINOSAUR ABC by Robert Crowther
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"From Allosaurus to Zuniceratops, a mix of familiar standbys and new or rare finds with bite-sized facts for confirmed dinomanes. (Informational pop-up book. 6-8)"
Twenty-six dinos rear up, unfold or slide into view in a pop-up prehistoric procession. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WHITE HOUSE by Robert Sabuda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"A selective but resplendent tour. (Informational pop-up. 6-9)"
White House high spots, presented with 3-D flair by the archon of paper architects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BUNNY IN THE BALLET by Robert Beck
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2014

"Alas, not the stuff of dreams for balletomane readers. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Toe shoes and tutus are the stuff of dreams for a rabbit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRAGON & THE KNIGHT by Robert Sabuda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"With Sabuda, it's hard to set expectations too high or wide, but here he rides triumphantly roughshod over them anyway. (Pop-up picture book. 5-9)"
Sabuda gives the usual relationship between story and picture a hefty tweak in this pop-up romp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Sleep, Cher Ami, sleep!' (Picture book. 5-9)"
During World War I, the U.S. Army relied on a flock of 600 carrier pigeons to send messages back to headquarters from troops in the field, and one, Cher Ami, became famous for saving the "Lost Battalion," which had been trapped behind enemy lines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DREAMKEEPER by Robert Ingpen
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 1, 2006

"Many authors have produced less than good results trying to make a homespun family tale into a published creature; this one works. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Written as a letter to his granddaughter and full of lovely rhetorical and visual flourishes, Ingpen describes the fellow "who catches our bad dreams when they try to escape to become real." Read full book review >