Search Results: "Robert L. Carter"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2005

"A thoughtfully argued memoir that shows—as if proof were needed—that 'the struggle to make equality for all people a fundamental tenet in our society continues.'"
An architect of the celebrated Brown v. Board of Education suit recalls a long life spent fighting for equal treatment under the law. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"The authors do a commendable job of showing just how righteous Carter's cause was, bringing deserved honor to their subject."
A well-grounded exposé of the official racism that for more than half a century denied due honor to a combat hero, as told by his daughter-in-law and historian Allen (The Port Chicago Mutiny, 1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"Sure to provoke much acclamation and dissent."
An important broadside attack on, as Carter (Law/Yale; Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby, 1991) puts it, the ``effort to banish religion for politic's sake.'' In this passionately argued polemic—which Carter, a black Episcopalian, backs with personal anecdote, historical research, and legal brief—the case is made that something has gone awry in American politics since the heyday of the civil-rights struggle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PALACE COUNCIL by Stephen L. Carter
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 8, 2008

"The so-called masters of the genre could learn something from Carter's intoxicating blend of political street smarts and literary skill. This is Grade-A entertainment."
A brilliant black writer's harsh education in reality, a search for a lost sibling and the history of "a radical organization [created] to scare white America" are the primary ingredients of the third bulky thriller from Carter (Law/Yale; New England White, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1998

"When addressing powerful topics, wishy-washy meditations are just not very satisfying."
Interesting issues, disappointing book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REFLECTIONS OF AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION BABY by Stephen L. Carter
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 1991

"Americans seems to overlook the harsh historical reality and pervasive attitudes that made affirmative action a necessity."
Affirmative-action programs have ``run their course'' and, according to this overworked, self-referential diatribe from Carter (Yale/Law), that's all to the good. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW ENGLAND WHITE by Stephen L. Carter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 2, 2007

"An overload of exposition and a truckload of involved characters aside, this is a virtually irresistible—and highly intelligent—thriller. Carter strikes again."
A high-profile murder unsettles a New England college town in this eventful second novel from Carter (Law/Yale; The Emperor of Ocean Park, 2002, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 10, 2012

"A smart and engaging what-if that has the virtue of being plausible—and the added virtue of not having been written by Bill O'Reilly, so that the real facts are actually facts."
Law professor turned novelist Carter (The Emperor of Ocean Park, 2002, etc.) waxes counterfactual—and sometimes piles historical nonfacts to dizzying heights. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BACK CHANNEL by Stephen L. Carter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2014

"The tale grinds too slowly at turns and runs a touch too long, but Carter delivers a satisfying historical thriller with some nice cliffhanging moments."
Mutually assured destruction meets the dawning civil rights era in legal scholar/novelist Carter's (Yale Law School; The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln, 2012, etc.) latest novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMPEROR OF OCEAN PARK by Stephen L. Carter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2002

"A melodrama with brains and heart to match its killer plot."
This sleek, immensely readable first novel by Yale law professor Carter, author of such provocative nonfiction as The Culture of Disbelief (1993) and God's Name in Vain (2000), is custom-designed for the kind of commercial success enjoyed by John Grisham's The Firm 11 years ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 1994

"If we should learn to think of public service as a reward, not a calling, and the Supreme Court as a check on majority tyranny rather than a parallel force of public will, then shouldn't he have written more about how to change public attitudes?"
An evenhanded, thoughtful, but ultimately frustrating analysis of the sound-bite-driven confirmation process, by a scholar who regularly ventures into the public debate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INTEGRITY by Stephen L. Carter
NON-FICTION
Released: March 13, 1996

"Carter has a supple mind and readable style, but these are overwhelmed by the overinflated and underrealized material. ($50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
In the footsteps of fellow virtuecrats such as William Bennett and Michael Lewis, another ringing defense of the obvious. Read full book review >