Search Results: "Robert M. Farnsworth"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1996

"A resonant briefing on an American who bore eloquent witness to a turning point in Asian history. (12 illustrations, not seen)"
However long the odds on such a conjunction, two biographies of Snow are scheduled for publication in June, Though S. Bernard Thomas's Season of High Adventure (see page 519) is more complete, Farnsworth is livelier and offers greater detailed about the geopolitical forces convulsing Asia during Snow's sojourn there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD OATH by Christopher Farnsworth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 18, 2010

"A paranormal thriller begging for a slot in airport bookshops."
There are secret agents and then there are secret agents, like the undead predator protecting the White House. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KILLFILE by Christopher Farnsworth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Farnsworth, author of the fantastical Nathaniel Cade series (Red, White, and Blood, 2012, etc.), stands to expand his following with this clever, offbeat thriller."
Hired by billionaire Everett Sloan to determine whether a whiz kid who used to work for his data-mining outfit stole company secrets to start his own operation, mind-reading investigator John Smith finds himself targeted by a conspiratorial group with secret CIA connections. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

American Landscape by Robert M. Tucker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2013

"An ambitious but unevenly executed historical novel."
Tucker, in his debut, offers a detailed novel of 1930s America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1996

"A silent-service veteran's genuinely engrossing from-the- inside-out appraisal of an eventful period in the history of the US and the wider world. (Author tour)"
A career undercover man who reached the top of his furtive profession (as director of the CIA from late 1991 through early 1993), Gates sheds considerable light in this wide-angle memoir on the ways in which the craft of intelligence influenced government policy during the height of the Cold War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SONG OF ISAAC by Robert M. Bassett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 29, 2010

"Well-crafted, unorthodox take on the story of Isaac and his kin."
The dramatic extrapolation of an ancient story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEYLUV by Robert M. Sapolsky
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 20, 2005

"It isn't a radical notion that the nature-nurture debate ought to be tossed, but Sapolsky (A Primate's Memoir, 2001, etc.) has added another round to the cause of its demise."
Eighteen quick-footed essays that explain how nature and nurture are both vital ingredients in the stew of life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GERONIMO  by Robert M. Utley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 27, 2012

"This is no hagiography. Utley presents the culture, upbringing and external forces that made Geronimo the man he became, warts and all."
In addition to a biography of the great Native-American warrior, Utley (Little Bighorn Battlefield and Custer's Last Stand, 2011) takes readers on a tour of southern Arizona, New Mexico and Mexico. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECTION 60 by Robert M. Poole
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"A momentous and moving follow-up to On Hallowed Ground."
An honorable survey of Arlington National Cemetery's subdivision for military personnel killed in the global war on terror. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WALDEN'S SHORE by Robert M. Thorson
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 16, 2013

"An intriguing academic book best read in conjunction with Walden."
Thorson (Geology/Univ. of Connecticut; Beyond Walden: The Hidden History of America's Kettle Lake and Ponds, 2009, etc.) follows up his earlier work by establishing Henry David Thoreau's own scientific credentials. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIGGING JAMES DEAN by Robert M. Eversz
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Eversz gives Nina engaging depth, though the dense prose and grim story may turn off some readers."
In the course of helping a teenaged waif, a tabloid paparazza unearths a creepy cult. Read full book review >