Search Results: "Robert M. Hazen"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Multifaceted, and glittering with drama and wit. (B&w photographs, line drawings)"
The ancient alchemists sought for gold, but the new alchemists have found diamonds—in nearly unlimited quantities, and just a good squeeze away—reports Hazen (Science/George Mason University; coauthor, Science Matters, 1992, etc.) in this sparkling gem of technological history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2012

"A report of a fascinating new theory on the Earth's origins written in a sparkling style with many personal touches."
Hazen (Earth Science/George Mason Univ.; Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life's Origins, 2005, etc.) offers startling evidence that "Earth's living and nonliving spheres" have co-evolved over the past 4 billion years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 2, 1990

A first-rate exposition—thorough, accessible, and entertaining—of the rudiments of scientific knowledge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"As easy and delicious as a long-simmered stock."
As the author notes, chicken soup makes an appearance in the cuisine of virtually every country in the world as a cure for everything from colds to political unrest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

``My purpose is to tell a story,'' Crunden (American Civilization/Univ. of Texas at Austin; Ministers of Reform, 1982, etc.) writes in this spirited, learned, and epic first volume in a projected three-volume history of American encounters with modernism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Fascinating—a fine adjunct to the art and poetry of the New England stone wall. (Photographs)"
A skillful geo-archaeological study of New England's stone walls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREE SPEECH IN THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY by Robert M. O'Neil
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"A pragmatic, libertarian-minded, and well-informed legal handbook for the First Amendment on campus, albeit less likely to find a place in the student union or the faculty lounge than the administration offices."
Reasonably and a bit skeptically, O'Neil reviews the recent high-wire act that higher education has performed over free speech for students and professors, from Stanford's student speech code to classroom ``content warnings'' in Iowa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1996

"A resonant briefing on an American who bore eloquent witness to a turning point in Asian history. (12 illustrations, not seen)"
However long the odds on such a conjunction, two biographies of Snow are scheduled for publication in June, Though S. Bernard Thomas's Season of High Adventure (see page 519) is more complete, Farnsworth is livelier and offers greater detailed about the geopolitical forces convulsing Asia during Snow's sojourn there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Supporting both points of view with well-chosen anecdotes, a capable contribution to Ranger history. And though Utley breaks little new ground, he offers an accessible survey of some interesting—and bloody—times."
A rip-snortin', six-guns-blazin' saga of good guys and bad guys who were sometimes one and the same. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PRIMATE’S MEMOIR by Robert M. Sapolsky
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A wild and wondrous account, filled with passages so funny or so brilliant that the reader wants to grab someone by the arm and demand, 'Hey, you just gotta listen to this.'"
From the author of The Trouble with Testosterone (1997) and Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers (1993), a witty concoction blending field biology, history, hilarious cross-cultural mishaps, and hair-raising adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 15, 1974

Twenty-eight electroshock treatments were required to bring Pirsig back from the realms beyond Reason where, in hot pursuit of the nature of Quality, he "saw too much." Read full book review >