Search Results: "Robert M. Neer"


BOOK REVIEW

NAPALM by Robert M. Neer
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2013

"Long superseded by other widely denounced emblems of American exceptionalism (drones, cluster bombs, torture), napalm receives an overdue but thoroughly satisfying history."
The book begins with the story of the iconic 1972 photograph of a 9-year-old Vietnamese girl running naked down a road after being severely burned in a napalm attack. Readers expecting a polemic may be pleasantly surprised at this lucid account of the technical, political and ethical features of a notorious symbol of American inhumanity in war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNING GARBO by Robert M. Eversz
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Despite the fireworks, bad-girl Nina's third adventure is her most conventional whodunit. Expect her to be raising a family and baking cookies next time."
Paparazza Nina Zero's just trying to do her job, but people keep dying practically right under her lens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

``My purpose is to tell a story,'' Crunden (American Civilization/Univ. of Texas at Austin; Ministers of Reform, 1982, etc.) writes in this spirited, learned, and epic first volume in a projected three-volume history of American encounters with modernism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREE SPEECH IN THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY by Robert M. O'Neil
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"A pragmatic, libertarian-minded, and well-informed legal handbook for the First Amendment on campus, albeit less likely to find a place in the student union or the faculty lounge than the administration offices."
Reasonably and a bit skeptically, O'Neil reviews the recent high-wire act that higher education has performed over free speech for students and professors, from Stanford's student speech code to classroom ``content warnings'' in Iowa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE IMMIGRANT EXPERT by Robert M. Macala
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 23, 2014

"A hilarious, beauteous collection of immigrant tales."
Macala recounts the tall tales of his multinational Eastern European family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"A moving but not always convincing plea not to abandon Africa, reinforced by Betty Press's photographs memorably recording the people caught up in events the outside world has too often forgotten."
From the former correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor in Africa, a brief for hopeful change in Africa that is more heartfelt than persuasive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 15, 1974

Twenty-eight electroshock treatments were required to bring Pirsig back from the realms beyond Reason where, in hot pursuit of the nature of Quality, he "saw too much." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Supporting both points of view with well-chosen anecdotes, a capable contribution to Ranger history. And though Utley breaks little new ground, he offers an accessible survey of some interesting—and bloody—times."
A rip-snortin', six-guns-blazin' saga of good guys and bad guys who were sometimes one and the same. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1996

"A resonant briefing on an American who bore eloquent witness to a turning point in Asian history. (12 illustrations, not seen)"
However long the odds on such a conjunction, two biographies of Snow are scheduled for publication in June, Though S. Bernard Thomas's Season of High Adventure (see page 519) is more complete, Farnsworth is livelier and offers greater detailed about the geopolitical forces convulsing Asia during Snow's sojourn there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"A concise distillation of more than five decades of leadership knowledge—good reading for all of the 2016 presidential candidates."
The former secretary of defense offers insights into being an effective leader. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 14, 1997

"That, and a deft and often witty way with words. (Author tour)"
A sparkling set of essays by MacArthur awardee Sapolsky (Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers, 1993; Biology and Neuroscience/Stanford), who is not at all afraid to go out on a (primate) limb to discuss biology, brain, and behavior. Read full book review >