Search Results: "Robert M. Sapolsky"


BOOK REVIEW

MONKEYLUV by Robert M. Sapolsky
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 20, 2005

"It isn't a radical notion that the nature-nurture debate ought to be tossed, but Sapolsky (A Primate's Memoir, 2001, etc.) has added another round to the cause of its demise."
Eighteen quick-footed essays that explain how nature and nurture are both vital ingredients in the stew of life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PRIMATE’S MEMOIR by Robert M. Sapolsky
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A wild and wondrous account, filled with passages so funny or so brilliant that the reader wants to grab someone by the arm and demand, 'Hey, you just gotta listen to this.'"
From the author of The Trouble with Testosterone (1997) and Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers (1993), a witty concoction blending field biology, history, hilarious cross-cultural mishaps, and hair-raising adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 14, 1997

"That, and a deft and often witty way with words. (Author tour)"
A sparkling set of essays by MacArthur awardee Sapolsky (Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers, 1993; Biology and Neuroscience/Stanford), who is not at all afraid to go out on a (primate) limb to discuss biology, brain, and behavior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEHAVE by Robert M. Sapolsky
NON-FICTION
Released: May 2, 2017

"An exemplary work of popular science, challenging but accessible."
A wide-ranging, learned survey of all the making-us-tick things that, for better or worse, define us as human. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 20, 1993

"First-rate science for the nonscientist that's certain to reduce stress—at least during the time spent reading it. (Forty- two illustrations—not seen)"
Entertaining explanation of how stress affects the body and what we can do to counteract its effects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

M by Peter Robb
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 2000

"A compelling portrait of the painter as outsider and provocateur; a first-rate evocation of both a genius and the violent times in which he lived. (16 pages illus.)"
An exuberant attempt to penetrate the mysteries surrounding the astounding paintings and brief, turbulent life of the Italian artist who has come to be known as Caravaggio. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

M by Andrew Cook
NON-FICTION
Released: July 15, 2005

"For Bond fans and true-crime buffs, especially, a leisurely excursion into the early days of modern espionage."
A beat cop makes good, and anarchists quake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE M&M BOYS by Lara Reznik
Released: Nov. 8, 2014

"Just like its heroes, what this book lacks in sophistication it makes up for in heart; a warm, enjoyable baseball story."
A troubled kid learns valuable lessons about love, honor and friendship during the home-run race of 1961. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

M TRAIN by Patti Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Not as focused as Just Kids, but an atmospheric, moody, and bittersweet memoir to be savored and pondered."
Iconic poet, writer, and artist Smith (Just Kids, 2010, etc.) articulates the pensive rhythm of her life through the stations of her travels.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AGENT M by Henry Hemming
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 9, 2017

"Hemming has uncovered a man determined not to be known and in so doing, has provided us with delightful reading."
The dramatic story of the remarkable British spymaster who may have been the model for the James Bond character M. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S&M by Jeffrey DeShell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

STATEMENT PAGE Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

M and M by John A. Peak
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"An accomplished actioner with unfulfilled hints of something deeper."
What could be worse than a 17-week-old infant admitted to Gunnison Memorial Hospital showing signs of traumatic brain injury from grabbing, shaking, and banging? Dr. Vicki Shea, who's returned to medicine and finished a pediatric residency since last seen as a medical malpractice attorney (Mortal Judgment, 1999), finds out when she's assigned the case of Charlotte Sanderson, stilled by injuries her mother, Julia Wilkins-Sanderson, insists are the result of a highly improbable accident. Read full book review >