Search Results: "Robert Penn Warren"


BOOK REVIEW

BAND OF ANGELS by Robert Penn Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 22, 1955

"As September Literary Guild selection, many of the hurdles will be taken."
Warren, Pulitzer prize winner, erratic genius, poet, philosopher, novelist, short story writer, has written a provocative, at times brilliant book, which attacks from a different angle, the always moot subject of miscegenation and its aftermath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 12, 1981

"At its best, dark and moving work."
Increasingly prolific with age, Robert Penn Warren—poet, novelist, gut-historian—here regards mortality with his familiar passionate eloquence, and a new ferocity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAVE by Robert Penn Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 24, 1959

"It is a tale of muted violence, uninhibited in language and raw sex, but absorbing in the subtle play of human emotions."
Here is one of the South's most gifted and versatile writers with a new theme, handled in- for him- a wholly new vein. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 12, 1980

"Nor are there a dozen lines that pose cosmic questions about private destiny with as grand a flourish as the opening paragraph of his period novel, World Enough and Time (1950)."
This latest collection of Robert Penn Warren's poems give more evidence of his deficiencies—his affection for abstractions, like God, Truth, and Time, and his passion for the rhetorical question—than of his strengths. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 12, 1971

"A full-dress homage, introduced by three fervent poems by Warren."
A centennial celebration, which like Ellen Moers' excellent Two Dreisers (1969), reaches beyond the vast blunders and dramatic miseries of Dreiser's career (so exhaustively documented by Swanberg in his 1965 biography) to the central tensions in Dreiser's life and work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORLD ENOUGH AND TIME by Robert Penn Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 20, 1950

"An unusual and difficult book —oddly dated in style and substance, but an authentic mirroring of the moods and passions of the times."
Short story writer, poet and Pulitzer Prize Award winner with All the King's Men, Robert Penn Warren has established his right to speak for his native Kentucky — as well as for his adoptive Louisiana. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 1956

"And he recognizes- as he turns North-a vast sense of relief at escape from responsibility, from the divisiveness that characterizes the Southerner."
Kentucky born poet, novelist, journalist, Pulitzer prize winner, Robert Penn Warren will be listened to as the average Northerner with comparable acceptance would not. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 4, 1971

"And in spite of the 'luminous' (another favored word) overcast, the air is thick with loss, regret and failure."
Life was the way things went away from you, and left you standing," indeed abandoned in the loneliness which shrouds this new novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 27, 1965

"This montage portrait of a revolution in process has a cumulative effect."
In 1929-30, Robert Penn Warren wrote from England an essay on the Negro in the South which he recalls as "a cogent and humane defense of segregation." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHT RIDER by Robert Penn Warren
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 1939

"It is over-long, but has many passages of exceptional writing."
Here's a book that may prove important from the angle of critical acclaim but that will scarcely class as popular in its appeal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW AND SELECTED ESSAYS by Robert Penn Warren
Released: March 29, 1989

"Just great, old-fashioned musing by a brilliant man."
Elegantly written—and elegantly imagined—critical essays on literature and the love it breeds; by the octogtenarian American poet laureate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 18, 1964

"The symbolic characters are all familiar, and the hero's search for the life of the heart brittle, but Mr. P.W. can write up a storm."
Again Mr. Penn Warren has his way with a Southern town — from the forlorn green with the statue of the Confederate soldier to the sightless shop fronts- but in this case the characters are lyric shadows from other Warren main streets, and the rotagonist is a half-realized remnant of the artist's ruminations. Read full book review >