Search Results: "Robert Rowland Smith"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2011

"Amusing and occasionally insightful, but too reliant on oversimplification."
A lighthearted examination of major life milestones through the lens of major philosophical thinkers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLOCK by James Robert Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Utterly disposable thriller unredeemed by its ecological message. One part Michael Crichton's science and a smidgen of Carl Hiaasen's humor add up to less than either."
In this first novel, dinosaurs stalk Florida's longleaf savanna—and they know about us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 29, 2012

"A notable, brief overview of the state of American law, without the jargon."
Smith (West's Law Dictionary, 1993, etc.) breaks down the ins and outs of U.S. government and law. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A vivid, interpretive briefing on a landmark episode of the cold war. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Compelling revisionist history of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis that puts JFK and his brother Robert in the worst possible light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1993

"Elegant, lovingly detailed all-star memories. (Sixteen pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
Mellifluous essays on the dawn of baseball, by a veteran sportswriter (My Life in the North Woods, 1986, etc.). ``When I inhale the full and mellow fragrance of a new baseball glove,'' writes Smith, ``I find it easy to summon the light of other years around me.'' His evocation begins with his own youth: playing sandlot games with a ball wrapped in black friction tape and watching it crash through a neighbor's window; visiting the Red Sox dugout, where he sees ``an exceptionally happy looking'' Babe Ruth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Indispensable source book for courses in women's studies, especially valuable for its coverage of a multitude of court cases."
Analysis of the issues, strategies, and tactics behind the battles that have been fought—and continue to be fought—over the rights of women in the US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2003

"Well-presented scientific history with an interesting philosophical twist: take with a grain of salt."
A revisionist argument that the Catholic Church was right to try the father of astronomy on charges of heresy in 1633. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"For space aficionados especially but also a good choice for general readers seeking an introduction to an underappreciated, thrilling chapter in aerospace history."
An aviation historian revisits the conception, development, and inaugural flight of "the last American flying machine built to fly higher and faster than everything that had come before." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN OPEN SPACES by Russell Rowland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2002

"Prose pretty much stripped of graces remains useful for this unpretentious, involving story told with unfaltering authority."
A heartfelt debut in which a Montana ranch family battles both Mother Nature and human nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 26, 1991

"Provocative revisionist history that could stimulate a widespread reevaluation of the traditional view of why America entered WW II. (Twenty-five b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Here, Thompson (Pledge to Destiny: Charles de Gaulle and the Rise of the Free French, 1974; Foreign Policy/Univ. of South Carolina) argues that FDR, greatly exceeding his executive powers, led a depressed, militarily weak, and traditionally isolationist America into WW II by forcing Germany and Japan to go to war with us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LATE BENEDICTION FOR FATHER'S DAY by Robert Bruce Smith
NON-FICTION
Released: July 31, 2007

"Stories that stand the test of time."
A grandfatherly yarn about growing up during the Depression in a Northwest logging town. Read full book review >