Search Results: "Robert W. McChesney"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 2013

"A valuable addition to the literature on the digital age."
A provocative and far-reaching account of how capitalism has shaped the Internet in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 11, 2013

"An alarming, not-incorrect diagnosis, but an argument too one-sided and a solution so lofty as to be of little use."
Collaborating once more (The Death and Life of American Journalism: The Media Revolution that Will Begin the World Again, 2010), Nichols, the Nation's Washington, D.C., correspondent, and academic McChesney (Communications/Univ. of Illinois) decry the pernicious influence of Big Money on our elections. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 8, 2016

"An authoritative account of the challenges facing progressives wishing to fuse better governance with economic justice."
An energetic if grim discussion of inequality and the coming era of underemployment, viewed through the lens of the forgotten American progressive narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"The authors' argument gets a little soft when they trumpet their media-reform platform—but, to gauge by this book, no one else but the right is going to do the job. Good fuel for progressive responses to the Fox cabal."
The media are immoral, biased, unreliable and unpatriotic. But, The Nation correspondent Nichols and media scholar McChesney argue, it's the right's fault, not the left's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2011

"Current and often enlightening—of particular interest to academic libraries—but not essential."
A well-curated collection of essays on the decline of the newspaper industry and the future of journalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 18, 2000

"Hartigan depicts Wilson as not only an organizational genius, but also as an amazingly resilient, largely appealing, and otherwise immensely interesting human being."
A readable, informative, succinct, respectful, but nonreverential biography of Bill Wilson (1895-1971), the guiding spirit and organizer of Alcoholics Anonymous, the hugely successful (millions of members in 140 countries) Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELÉCTRICO W by Hervé Le Tellier
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2013

"Delicate handling of deep themes—loss, missed connections, meaninglessness—gives the novel an emotional charge greater than its low-key particulars and pacing."
A French journalist and a Portuguese photographer find they have some uncomfortable things in common in this latest from Le Tellier (Enough About Love, 2011, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

W IS FOR WEBSTER by Tracey Fern
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A fascinating look at the determination and vision that led one man to create an essential resource. (author's note, sources) (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
Noah Webster's path to creating his iconic dictionary is brought to life in this picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEORGE W. BUSH by James Mann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Presidential reputations often improve with time and rarely decline. Aware of this, Mann delivers a remarkably evenhanded account, eschewing the painful emotions many readers will feel until historians sort matters out."
The latest in the admirable American Presidents series is premature because too little time has passed to evaluate our 43rd president, but Mann (Fellow in Residence/Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Advanced International Studies; The Obamians: The Struggle Inside the White House, 2012, etc.) writes an insightful biography without much partisanship.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLDMINE--LONDON W.1. by Philip Daniels
Released: Oct. 13, 1993

"Slight, but not without charm, as old-hand Daniels (aka Peter Chambers—The Day the Thames Caught Fire, 1990, etc.) sets in motion a twist or two, including one implicating Walton's former nemesis in the Austen's venture."
Architect Edward Walton—who lost his wife to his business partner and said goodbye to ten years of freedom thanks to the cad's (false) embezzlement charges—is finally released from prison and, in short order, meets the lovely sales rep Peggy and the mysterious ``Major,'' who promises him 100,000 pounds if he'll construct an underground tunnel for him. Read full book review >