Search Results: "Robin Cruise"


BOOK REVIEW

FIONA'S PRIVATE PAGES by Robin Cruise
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2000

"So will kids. (Fiction. 8-12)"
If readers haven't yet met the main character, they'll clamor for Cruise's first novel about her after reading this engaging book, written in journal-entry style. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Cruise doesn't offer any new insights on the well-trodden subject, but she does present a young girl's coping with divorce in a way that will be meaningful to middle graders. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Through the journal entries of a 10-year-old, Cruise explores the healing power of writing and expression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BARTLEBY SPEAKS! by Robin Cruise
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 4, 2009

"A sweetly underscored paean to the beauty of quiet. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Wee toddler Bartleby is almost as inscrutable as his Melvillean namesake, though a sight more cooperative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONLY YOU by Robin Cruise
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2007

"As a statement of childhood's most unalienable right, it doesn't come any clearer. (Picture book. 3-5)"
This parent-child love poem reaches out and cuddles its dual audience close. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE MAMÁ FORGETS by Robin Cruise
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 5, 2006

"Warm and wise. (glossary of Spanish words and phrases) (Picture book. 4-8)"
A Mexican-American grandmother may be getting a bit forgetful, but she still remembers what's really important. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

14TH by Sue Cruise
Released: Dec. 5, 2012

"A nostalgic little gem of a novel, with a quietly powerful message."
In Cruise's debut novel, the death of a middle-aged Texan's mother prompts him to reflect upon his childhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 26, 1997

"A well-told tale deftly combining adventure, outsize characters, and lively scenes of a wild land in the process of being explored and settled. (11 photos, 11 line drawings, not seen)"
A history of a little known 187374 expedition over a vast tract of Canadian wilderness by new police recruits, made to pacify Indians, monitor the long Canadian/US border, destroy the whiskey trade to the tribes, and bring law to Canada's wild west. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"A sad reminder of what we have lost: O'Brien's penetrating intelligence and earnest voice."
A slim, slicing analysis of some pivotal issues in the presidency of George Washington, who sought to finesse England and France and to deal simultaneously with political foes and two-faced friends at home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"O'Brien makes a well-argued revisionist contribution to the literature on Jefferson."
Irish scholar and former diplomat O'Brien (Ancestral Voices, 1995, etc.) examines two dark sides of the Jeffersonian legacy: his enthusiasm for the French Revolution, and his support for the slave-based Southern economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 16, 2010

"Given that the fight continues to protect wild horses and ban the slaughter of horses of whatever kind, this book is timely, though it pales next to Deanne Stillman's Mustang: The Saga of the Wild Horse in the American West (2008)."
Modest tale of a scrappy advocate for wild horses and her three-decade battle for their protection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"A disappointing effort at a time when clear thinking about democracy is essential."
The latest offering from the distinguished scholar and diplomat (The Great Melody, 1992, etc.) is a brief collection of his Massey Lectures, delivered at the University of Toronto and over the CBC Radio. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Strong on O'Brien but weak on Burke—and most readers will have to resort to a handbook on the religious and political controversies of the 18th century, as well to as a conventional Burke biography, to make sense of it all. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
O'Brien (Pro-Chancellor/Univ. of Dublin; Cunning and Passion, 1988, etc.) argues here that Edmund Burke (1729-97), widely considered the ``father of modern conservatism,'' was really a ``liberal pluralist.'' Neither biography (not even an ``unconventional'' one, as O'Brien claims) nor anthology (too little Burke, too much O'Brien), this is an extended political essay focusing on four arenas of 18th-century political life—Ireland, America, India, and France- -preceded by an attack on the dominant school of Burke scholarship, which, in assessing Burke as a conservative, consigned him, O'Brien says, to ``the ash-bin of history.'' O'Brien believes that he can provide the ``basis and essentials for a Burke revival'' by proving that Burke was, in fact, a prophet of revolution. Read full book review >